Distributive Analysis


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Distributive Analysis

 

a method of linguistic research in which the classification of linguistic units and the study of their features are carried out on the basis of the distribution of the units in question in the spoken chain—that is, on the basis of their combinability with other units, which are called the environment, or context, of the units in question. Distributive analysis was devised by representatives of so-called descriptive linguistics.

References in periodicals archive ?
The rule of law inspires other discussions within the field of the distributive analysis of the law.
This implies that the debates on activism are stigmatized, from the perspective of liberal legalism; and documented as a phenomenology, from the perspective of distributive analysis (Alviar & Jaramillo, 2012).
From the perspective of distributive analysis, this emphasis on procedures implies the concealing of the malleability of procedural norms and the naturalization of the forms or the procedures as a neutral exercise of the law (Jaramillo & Alfonso, 2008; Duncan Kennedy, 1976).
Based on the premises proposed by distributive analysis, the case study is focused on deconstructing the ideas related to the inevitability and certainty of the rule of law.
Despite this, the rule of law also operates as documented in the distributive analysis, where it is evident that these forms conceal the discretionality of the mothers who make their own decisions and the result of the social policy, as unpredictable and contingent and non-controllable by the "law," understood as a system.
Following what has been set out by Robert Hale, some realist authors and some representatives of critical legal studies such as Duncan Kennedy, distributive analysis insists that the "market" or the "private" are a result of the legal regulations that decide between privileges in terms of a particular group of people with particular forms of operation (such as property and contract rights).