disturbance

(redirected from Disturbance regimes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

disturbance

1. Law an interference with another's rights
2. Geology
a. a minor movement of the earth causing a small earthquake
b. a minor mountain-building event
3. Meteorol a small depression
4. Psychiatry a mental or emotional disorder

disturbance

[də′stər·bəns]
(communications)
An undesired interference or noise signal affecting radio, television, or facsimile reception.
(control systems)
An undesired command signal in a control system.
(geology)
Folding or faulting of rock or a stratum from its original position.
(meteorology)
Any low or cyclone, but usually one that is relatively small in size and effect.
An area where weather, wind, pressure, and so on show signs of the development of cyclonic circulation.
Any deviation in flow or pressure that is associated with a disturbed state of the weather, such as cloudiness and precipitation.
Any individual circulatory system within the primary circulation of the atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because published accounts of correlations between disturbance regimes and diversity, as well as productivity and diversity, usually show either a linear or a nonlinear, unimodal relationship, we only tested for linear relationships, or for nonlinear relationships that fit the generalized curve
Differences in disturbance regimes are probably responsible for this observed relation of elevation with maximum tree age.
Community resilience to low-frequency (10-100 yr) (Myers, 1990), high-intensity disturbance such as stand-replacing fire suggests that the scrub biota has evolved under selective pressure from such a disturbance regime.
Long-term study of canopy dynamics in a large area is necessary for estimating spatial-temporal variable gap disturbance regimes.
To explore hypotheses of allogenic coexistence we measured aspects of growth and survival in the understory and attainment of canopy status in gaps during different disturbance regimes.
Yet in many cases, natural disturbance regimes, their consequences for forest structure, and their variability over the landscape mosaic are poorly understood.
This illustrates the point that attempts to predict the invasion process should take site productivity into account as well as disturbance regime.
A systematic approach needs to be taken towards understanding the impact of varying spatial and temporal structures of disturbance regimes on ecological patterns and process in continuous landscapes.
They co-occur in greatest abundance in moist forests where small gaps dominate the disturbance regime.
The prevalence of a particular regenerative strategy in a forest community may depend on the disturbance regime of the forest (Whitmore 1990).
Part III, System-Level Concerns, consists of three chapters: one on species interactions and disturbance regimes by Meffe, Carroll, and Stuart L.
Simulations 2 and 3 assume that increasing fuel loads, warming temperatures, and more frequent lightning will yield disturbance regimes similar to those in lower- latitude vegetation zones, with fire rates increasing in a stepwise manner.