disturbance

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disturbance

1. Law an interference with another's rights
2. Geology
a. a minor movement of the earth causing a small earthquake
b. a minor mountain-building event
3. Meteorol a small depression
4. Psychiatry a mental or emotional disorder

disturbance

[də′stər·bəns]
(communications)
An undesired interference or noise signal affecting radio, television, or facsimile reception.
(control systems)
An undesired command signal in a control system.
(geology)
Folding or faulting of rock or a stratum from its original position.
(meteorology)
Any low or cyclone, but usually one that is relatively small in size and effect.
An area where weather, wind, pressure, and so on show signs of the development of cyclonic circulation.
Any deviation in flow or pressure that is associated with a disturbed state of the weather, such as cloudiness and precipitation.
Any individual circulatory system within the primary circulation of the atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Mediterranean Basin we only have a slight idea of how anthropogenic regimes may have affected plant community structure in the past (Blondel & Vigne, 1993; Blondel & Aronson, 1995) or of how the new spatial scales of the disturbance regimes associated with present economical conditions will affect vegetation processes (Romane et al.
In Mediterranean systems, given the scales of the disturbance regimes with respect to those at which species interact, and their postdisturbance strategies, the expected dynamics are qualitatively very different from the ones observed in temperate forests (Zedler, 1981).
If these disturbances were to cease, natural disturbance regimes might maintain mixed holm oak--Aleppo pine stands or, on the contrary, drive the system to a shifting mosa ic of monospecific patches.
Aleppo pines and holm oaks are likely to coexist if the disturbance regime allows the pine to capture openings earlier than oak ramets (given that the oak was already present) or if environmental heterogeneity prevents the holm oak from successfully colonizing available microsites at all times.
In general, the interaction of varying land-use practices over several millennia, superimposed on an already heterogeneous environment, has increased diversity both overall and in sites with intermediate disturbance regime s.
These ideas are widely accepted, but their limits have been little explored (Zedler & Zammitt, 1989), especially in relation to spatial or temporal variability of other ecological factors, including the disturbance regime.