disulfide

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disulfide

[dī′səl‚fīd]
(chemistry)
A compound that has two sulfur atoms bonded to a radical or element.
One of a group of organosulfur compounds RSSR′ that may be symmetrical (R=R′) or unsymmetrical (R and R′, different).
References in periodicals archive ?
5] patented compounds of the general molecular formular X(Y)NCSSZ, where X is hydrogen or alkyl group, Y is hydrogen, alkyl or aryl group and Z is metallic in nature, and thiuram disulfide derivatives, as fungicides, bactericides and microbiocides.
The formation of cysteine-homocysteine disulfides has been suggested to disrupt the intramolecular disulfide bonds in fibrillin-1 (7).
8) Control of the vulcanizing/devulcanizing behavior of diphenyl disulfide using microwaves as heating source.
While not all of the disulfides were effective against Plasmodium falciparum, the malaria parasite, those that were were also effective at killing the cancer cells.
Most people are familiar with oil's ability to grease moving parts, but some of the best lubricants used in industry today are solids, such as tungsten disulfide.
com/research/562cr5/dimethyl) has announced the addition of the "Dimethyl Disulfide (DMDS) (CAS 624-92-0) Market Research Report 2012" report to their offering.
One variant can be made to form a disulfide bridge, which increases resistance to denaturation.
Only a small proportion of thiol-containing amino acids occur in reduced form, and these forms rapidly oxidize to form disulfides in blood removed for analysis (5,6).
Giuseppi Bruni (1873-1946), Italian chemist, for important contributions to the early discovery and development of organic accelerators, including (1) the use of zinc and other metallic salts of disubstituted dithiocarbamic acids; (2) the use of tetrasubstituted thiuram disulfides for "sulfurless" curing; (3) the use of mercaptobenzothiazole as an accelerator; and for other significant contributions to rubber chemistry.
4) to remove low-molecular weight thiols and disulfides.
Many are capable of detecting very low picomolar concentrations; HPLC also has the advantage of measuring various thiols and disulfides other than GSH.
Hcy occurs in the circulation in multiple forms, including Hcy linked via disulfides to albumin (-70%), as a mixed disulfide with Cys (25%), as a disulfide-linked dimer (<5%), as the free reduced amino acid (<5%), and as a thiolactone (trace) (5-6).