Dixieland


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Dixieland

1. a form of jazz that originated in New Orleans, becoming popular esp with White musicians in the second decade of the 20th century
2. a revival of this style in the 1950s

Dixieland

 

the name of early American white jazz groups. In their music, the Dixieland players imitated the traditional Negro jazz bands of New Orleans (the first Dixieland groups arose in that city in 1915). Dixieland bands were most popular in the mid-1920’s and from the late 1930’s to the early 1940’s. Dixieland bands exist in many countries, including the USSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dixieland Band was one of three original stallions to stand at Lane's End Farm upon his retirement to stud in 1985.
Dixieland jazz combines brass band marches and instruments such as the trumpet (or cornet), trombone and clarinet, and these instruments are prominent in the Carnival.
Robert Jones and Melissa Stewart provide a helpful treatment of postliberalism, along with a fascinating look at the conservative Dixieland reception of a rather radical, postliberal theologian, Stanley Hauerwas.
Far from the days of books like Waiting To Exhale that address substantive issues with cultural accuracy in an accessible way, titles like Playing With Boys by Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez and Cara Lockwood's Dixieland Sushi are among the latest to capitalize on cultural stereotypes and bad cliches.
A dixieland jazz band was on hand to welcome customers to the revamped Wine REPublic bar.
Each book offers a nice array of blues, jazz and Dixieland pieces, and they still sound very fresh and appealing.
Entertainment provided by the Roaming Dixieland Band.
This week's celebrations include a performance of Dixieland jazz from the RAF
Every hour, traditional, Dixieland, swing, and big bands will feature toe-tapping songs like "Canal Street Blues" and "Big Bear Stomp.
Among the artists featured are the Original Dixieland Jazz Band performing "Livery Stable Blues" (the first recording of a jazz band in New York); the lesbian "empress of the blues," Bessie Smith, with her tidal-wave sound; sassy Cotton Club mama Ethel Waters; and gay iconoclastic, keyboard man Cecil Taylor as well as Sarah Vaughan, Billie, Ella, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and far too many more to mention.
Here it has gotten perhaps a little simplistic, yet it's amusing to recall that when the Original Dixieland Jass [sic] Band arrived at Reisenweber's in New York in 1917, posters had to be displayed explaining that the music was intended for dancing.
Each location had a different menu and a Dixieland band, which also moved from floor to floor, provided a festive flair.