Diyarbakir

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Diyarbakir

(dēyär`bäkŭr'), anc. Amida, city (1990 pop. 375,767), capital of Diyarbakir prov., SE Turkey, on the Tigris (Dicle) River. It is the trade center for a region producing grains, melons, cotton, copper ore, and petroleum. Manufactures of the city include flour, wine, textiles, and machinery. A Roman colony from A.D. 230, the city was taken (mid-4th cent.) by Shapur II of Persia. It was conquered by the Arabs in 638 and later was held by the Seljuk Turks and Persians. The Ottoman Turks captured Diyarbakir in 1515. It is a Kurdish population center, and has been the scene of fighting between Kurdish guerrillas and government forces. The city retains the magnificent black basalt fortification walls mainly constructed by Constantine I in the 4th cent. Diyarbakir Univ. is there.

Diyarbakir

 

a city in southeastern Turkey, on the Tigris River, capital of Diyarbakir Vilayet (province). Population in 1970, 138,700. A railroad station and highway junction are located here, as are various food and textile industries, an automobile assembly plant, and cloth and morocco leather crafts. To the northwest of Diyarbakir are copper and chrome mines.

References in periodicals archive ?
Petronas estimates that the Diyarbekir formations have about 5.
PILOT PROJECT In 2006 Petronas Carigali started pilot commercial production in Diyarbekir oil field that marked an important stage of partnership between the government of Turkmenistan and the Malaysian company.
SANANDAJ, ONE OF THE FOUR IRAnian Kurdish provinces, is a city of 350,000 people and far more prosperous and modern than the other capitals of Kurdistan--Suleimania or Erbil in Iraqi Kurdistan, or Diyarbekir in Turkish Kurdistan.
Petronas of Malaysia, which has an oil and gas PSA for the Diyarbekir field (Block 1), estimates this has 5.
But the more ostensible symbol of the officer's unique status is the "officers house", be it in Istanbul or in Diyarbekir, in Izmir or Van.
In November 1978 he created the Party of the Workers of Kurdistan (PKK) at Lice, near Diyarbekir, with 23 friends, including some Turks.
She now lives in Diyarbekir in a flat lacking everything - but, unlike thousands of families of villagers deported from their homes, she has a real roof.
Born in 1940 in Silvan, a small town near Diyarbekir, the "capital" of Turkish Kurdistan, Mehdi Zana has spent more than 15 years of his life in prison: one year in 1967; three from 1971-1974; 11 from 1980-1991 and almost a year and a half during 1994/1995.