Docetism

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Docetism

(dōsēt`ĭzəm) [Gr.,=to appear], early heretical trend in Christian thought. Docetists claimed that Christ was a mere phantasm who only seemed to live and suffer. A similar tendency to deny Jesus' humanity appeared in the teachings of Simon Magus, Marcion, Gnosticism, and certain phases of monarchianism.
References in periodicals archive ?
and] their disdain for the physical led them to a docetic, disembodied view of Christ" (Lee, 1987, p.
In this meticulously documented study, Hinlicky traces how the Christian doctrines of the Incarnation and the Trinity developed over the first 400 years of the church's existence amid rival philosophical schools such as middle and late Platonism and in conflict with heretical Docetic and gnostic interpretations of Scripture.
Oddly enough, even some evangelicals have jumped onto the docetic bandwagon of story but not history.
58) "As a theophany, she is assimilated to the example of Christ as understood by Ibn 'Arabi and all the Spirituals of Islam, namely, in accordance with a docetic Christology" (ibid.
35] This Docetic Christ is not known as companion to the poor and oppressed in their everyday world (see Luke 4:18-19).
In the first Christian centuries when Docetic tendencies attempted to blot out the genuine humanity of Jesus Christ, Mary's genuine female pregnancy and birthgiving protected his identification with the human race.
Such an understanding denies the human character of the Bible, turning it into something Docetic, without flesh and bones, like claiming that the bread of the Eucharist isn't really bread.
Newbigin confesses, "I still feel that you are really docetic in your thinking about the Church.
Despite Schleiermacher's effort to build his Christology from the earthly Jesus to the Christ of faith - often referred to as "from below" versus "from above" - his descriptions of the union often fail to preserve the tension between divine and human, almost presenting a docetic portrait of Christ.
This docetic Christianity goes against any integrated worldviews, whether they are African or theological.
64) For example, Meier identifies four ways that the appropriation of historical Jesus research may serve the interests of theology by working against attempts to reduce faith in Christ to a content-less cipher, to swallow up the real humanity of Jesus in a Docetic manner, to domesticate Jesus, or to co-opt Jesus for political programs.
According to the 2nd-century Docetic heresy, Jesus only "appeared" to have a physical body; he was not really human in the full physical sense, which would have inevitably included the sexual dimension.