bench dog

(redirected from Dog hole)

bench dog

[′bench ‚dȯg]
(engineering)
A wood or metal peg, placed in a slot or hole at the end of a bench; used to keep a workpiece from slipping.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reader Lee Wooldridge had a point when he posted: "Snobs was all about it being a dog hole with great music.
It was Liam's stuntman and his horse had just hit a prairie dog hole.
It was Liam's stunt man and his horse had just hit a prairie dog hole.
1 dog one's footsteps 2 put on the dog (wear fur) 3 doggone 4 dog's breakfast 5 play dog in the manger 6 dogsbody 7 dog eared 8 nose around 9 go to the dogs 10 doggy fashion/style 11 dog Latin 12 dogfight 13 lazy person 14 dog collar 15 dogs 16 a hair of the dog that bit one 17 the dog before his master 18 dog end 19 pup tent 20 dog watch 21 dog soldier 22 dog tag 23 doggy work 24 dog leg 25 influenza 26 in the doghouse 27 dog hole 28 (Al Capp's) Dogpatch 29 dog water 30 dog's dick 31 dog's vomit 32 let the dog see the rabbit 33 puppy love 34 bitchy 35 drunk as a fiddler's bitch
Witnesses reported that Dobbins was drinking and target-shooting at Dead Dog Hole with about eight other people, deputies said.
On each side of the shooting ports, Kamper added lumber supports, one on the outside edge of the dog hole and one along the front roof seam.
Parking my truck in a dry wash, I headed for my hide, hoping the coolness of the pre-dawn air had the rattlers seeking shelter in prairie dog holes.
The phenomenon is one Hansell connects to goby fish hiding in shrimp tunnels and burrowing owls nesting in prairie dog holes.
My MB has more dog holes for my work, Steve's has custom holes for his bowl carving jigs and hold-downs.
Sterling adds, "The myth that cattle break legs in prairie dog holes is just that: myth.
Nearby, a resident badger emerges from its den in a puff of dust; a burrowing owl sprints through the short grass to snatch a mouse diving for cover; and coyotes position themselves beside a warren of prairie dog holes, ready to pounce.
They sometimes hunt by sitting on the ground near prairie dog holes, waiting for dinner to emerge.