Dogen

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Dōgen

(dō`gĕn), 1200–1253, Zen master (see Zen BuddhismZen Buddhism,
Buddhist sect of China and Japan. The name of the sect (Chin. Ch'an, Jap. Zen) derives from the Sanskrit dhyana [meditation]. In China the school early became known for making its central tenet the practice of meditation, rather than adherence
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) and founder of the Sōtō Zen school in Japan. After studying in China, he received the seal of enlightenment and succession to the Ts'ao-tung (Sōtō) school. In 1236 he established the first independent Zen temple in Japan. Sōtō Zen stresses zazen, sitting meditation, based on the Buddha's own practice. Whereas for Rinzai Zen koanskoan
[Jap.,=public question; Chin. kung-an], a subject for meditation in Ch'an or Zen Buddhism, usually one of the sayings of a great Zen master of the past. In the formative period of Ch'an in China, masters tested the enlightenment of their students and of each other
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 are a means to enlightenment, Sōtō stresses the identity of practice and attainment. Dōgen, unlike many Zen masters, stressed practice without rejecting scripture.

Bibliography

See H.-J. Kim, Dōgen Kigen, Mystical Realist (1975); Y. Yokei, Zen Master Dōgen (1976); F. Cook, How to Raise an Ox (1978); C. Bielefeldt, Dōgen's Manuals of Zen Meditation (1988); G. Snyder, The Teachings of Zen Master Dogen (1992).

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They cover composite authorship in Western Zhou bronze inscriptions; the case of the "Tianw[sz]nggui inscription; authorship in the Canon of Songs (ShiJing); the compiler as the narrator: awareness of authorship, authorial presence, and author figurations in Japanese imperial anthologies with a special focus on the Kokin wakashu; fluidity of belonging and creative appropriation: authorship and translation in an Early Sinic song ("Kongmudoha Ka"); appropriating genius: Jin Shengtan's construction of textual authority and authorship in his commented edition of Shuihu Zhuan (The Water Margin Saga); and enlightened authorship: the case of Dogen Kigen.
As Japanese Buddhism continued developing in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, two profoundly important Japanese figures, Myoan Eisai [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1141-1214) and Dogen Kigen [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1200-1253), went to China and returned with the teachings of Chan.
Collecting works by a wide variety of great authors, including Lao Tzu, Han Shan, Li Po, Dogen Kigen, Saigyo, and many more, The Poetry of Zen offers a cross-section of historical classics that all have in common a resonating theme conducive to meditation, reflection, and self-transformation.