Liancourt Rocks

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Liancourt Rocks,

Jap. Takeshima, Korean Dokdo or Tokdo, island group, 58 acres (23 hectares), in the SW Sea of Japan, roughly midway between the Japanese island of Honshu and the Korean peninsula. Consisting of two small rocky islands and nearby reefs, the Liancourt Rocks are claimed by Japan and South Korea, and have been occupied by South Korea since 1954. An irritant in Japanese-Korean relations, they are valuable mainly for the fisheries in the surrounding waters and the potential offshore mineral wealth.
References in periodicals archive ?
As per the new syllabus, islands in the East China Sea, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, and the South Korea-controlled Dokdo islands, known as Takeshima in Japan, are 'integral parts of Japanese territory'.
It will claim that the islands in the East China Sea, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, as well as the South Korea-controlled Dokdo islands that Japan calls Takeshima are integral parts of Japanese territory.
The one thing that unites both North and South Korea is the Japanese claim to what the Koreans call the Dokdo islands, which the Japanese call the Takeshima.
The Koreans, still enraged at Japan for almost a half-century of colonization, took the Dokdo islands without worrying about the move's legality.
We launched the action in protest at Japan's ridiculous claim over our Dokdo islands," the spokesman said, referring to the South Korea-controlled islets in the East Sea (Sea of Japan) that are known as Takeshima in Japan.
It does not seem a very wise move that a group of South Korean lawmakers would visit one of the Kuril Islands, the subject of a long-standing territorial dispute between Russia and Japan, as part of their campaign to manifest Korea's sovereignty over Dokdo islands in the East Sea.
The territorial row flared again last year following a surprise visit by South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak to the Dokdo islands, known by Japan as Takeshima.
The islands, called the Dokdo Islands in Korean, the Takeshima Islands in Japanese and the Liancourt Rocks in English, have been part of a territorial dispute between South Korea and Japan since Korea gained its independence from Japan after World War II.
Tensions boiled over in August after a surprise visit by South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak to the Dokdo islands, known as Takeshima in Japan.
Coupled with ongoing territorial disputes between the two over the Dokdo Islands (which South Korea administers, but Japan calls Takeshima and says belong to its Shimane Prefecture), historical memories and national narratives of past Japanese oppression leave many Koreans wary of a close diplomatic relationship.
Japan was infuriated by Lee s visit in August to the island chain, known as the Dokdo islands in Korean and the Takeshima islands in Japanese.
Relations between Tokyo and Seoul were badly damaged in August when Lee made a surprise visit to the Dokdo islands, which lie between the two countries.