Domagk


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Domagk

Gerhard . 1895--1964, German biochemist: Nobel prize for medicine (1939) for isolating sulphanilamide for treating bacterial infections
References in periodicals archive ?
Hager had never heard of Domagk and was surprised to learn that he had won a Nobel Prize in 1939, and was arrested by the Gestapo when he tried to claim the prize.
Domagk discovered sulfa, the first antibiotic, a breakthrough that meant infectious diseases were no longer a death sentence.
Before Domagk discovered sulfa in 1932, doctors were resigned to the fact that there was nothing they could do to stop the scourge of infectious disease.
Domagk had worked in a filthy field hospital in World War I, where he triaged the incoming wounded.
In the morning, Domagk would check on the wounded, sorting the dead from the not-yet-dead.
Domagk found that injections of bacteria into immunized mice were followed by an enormous phagocytosis of the bacteria through the endothelial cells of the lung, liver, etc.
Later, Gerhard Johannes Paul Domagk (1895-1964), a German anatomic pathologist and bacteriologist, discovered that a red dye called prontosil rubrum protected laboratory animals from lethal doses of staphylococci and hemolytic streptococci.
Chapter 1 provides a historical perspective to drug discovery, looking briefly at the pioneering work of researchers such as Ehrlich, Domagk, Fleming, Ahlquist and others.
The saga begins with Gerhard Domagk, who as a field physician for the German army in World War I witnessed soldiers' deaths and then dedicated his life to finding a way to protect other soldiers against the ravages of bacteria.