Dombra


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Dombra

 

(Kazakh dombyra), a Kazakh stringed instrument played by plucking. It is also found in Uzbekistan (dombyra, dumbrak) and Bashkiria (dumbyra). It has a pear-shaped body with a wooden soundboard, a long neck, and two sinew strings tuned in fourths (sometimes in fifths). The dombra produces a quiet and soft sound. There are two types of dombra: the western Kazakh dombra, with its more narrow neck and 14-17 frets, is strummed like a balalaika, while the eastern Kazakh dombra, with its somewhat thicker neck and seven to eight frets, is usually plucked. In 1934 the instrument was modified and a number of orchestral variants were designed.

References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier, the art of performance of dombra kyi and manufacturing skills of the Kazakh and Kyrgyz yurts were included on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in November 2014.
Folkloric dances and songs, the angelic sound of the dombra, precise horseback riding, and exquisite craftsmanship passed through generations all continue to captivate foreign guests.
The small theater near my office was in use constantly: young Kazakh men were often singing and playing dombra (a traditional stringed instrument) in the hallways outside, waiting for their turn to rehearse.
The song "Moon" Kurmangazy Kazakh National Conservatory, Dombra players 1.
Not only did he need to immerse himself in the culture and musical tradition of Kazakhstan but on a practical level he had to master traditional Kazakh instruments such as the kobyz and the dombra and pronunciation of the language.
In the old days, everyone learned to ride a horse and play the dombra.
My grandad played a Kazakh folk instrument called the Dombra (a triangular-bodied balalaika), and my grandmother sang along with him whenever guests came to the house.
Turan performs on ancient Kazakh instruments, including the lute-like zhetygen, sherter, and dombra (all plucked); the kyl kobyz ("the most ancient bowed instrument on earth"); the flute-like sybyzgy and saz syrnay; together with a host of percussive instruments, mouth harps, and throat singing.
Kazakh traditional art of Dombra Kuy has been inscribed on Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.
Also in August, ethnomusicologist and historian Adam Grode presented a program entitled "A Musical Journey in Central Asia," a concert-lecture that featured Kashgar Rawap and Kazakh Dombra, songs offered to promote understanding of the region's rich culture and musical heritage.
The art masters will demonstrate exciting and complex speeches, as well as knowledge of Kazakh folk songs and playing the dombra.