Ulpian

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Ulpian
NationalityRoman
Occupation
jurist

Ulpian

(Dometius Ulpianus) (ŭl`pēən), d. 228, Roman jurist. He was a member of the council of the jurist Papinian. As Praetorian prefect from 222, he enjoyed the favor of the emperor Alexander Severus, and he was murdered by the jealous Praetorian Guard. Ulpian's Libri ad edictum [edicts], a statement of the policy he would follow while in office, survives only in excerpts. Much of the Corpus Juris CivilisCorpus Juris Civilis
, most comprehensive code of Roman law and the basic document of all modern civil law. Compiled by order of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I, the first three parts appeared between 529 and 535 and were the work of a commission of 17 jurists presided over by the
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 is extracted from Ulpian's writings.

Ulpian

 

(Domitius Ulpianus). Born circa 170; died 228. Roman jurist.

Ulpian’s views were influenced by the Stoic philosophers. He believed that slavery was a contradiction of natural law, but he justified it on the basis of custom developed among all peoples and fixed by civil law and the law of nations (jus gentium). Ulpian also substantiated the validity of the unlimited power of the Roman emperors. His best-preserved work is Liber singularisregularum (Book of Rules). Four hundred twenty-six of Ulpian’s writings, together with works by four other prominent jurists, were made legally binding by statute. Fragments of Ulpian’s works constitute about one-third of the main part of the Byzantine codification of law (seeDIGEST).

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This legal activity reached its peak at the end of the 2nd and beginning of the 3rd centuries with lawyers such as Eneus Domitius Ulpianus (ca.