Donegild

Donegild

killed by Alla for abandoning his wife and son at sea. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Man of Law’s Tale”]
See: Murder
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Chaucer omits from his tale the elaborate description of Constaunce as an educated woman, one who receives letters in her own right and was known for her scholarship, but expansively describes the wickedness of Donegild (as well as that of the Sultaness, the first mother-in-law) polarizing the two kinds of women he depicts in the tale, evil and good, writing and non-writing, duplicitous and honest, Christian and pagan.
Here is the description of Chaucer's Donegild (mother of Alla, the second husband) who, again, is horrified that a Christian woman should bewitch her son into giving up his creed:
In Constance's story, part of the evil is obviously the treachery of the two mothers-in-law, the Sowdanesse and Donegild (with the latent theme of incest exploited in the two mother-son relationships), but the greater evil may be poetic, that is, in the Man of Law's attempt to represent providence as the guarantor of Constance's apparent innocence and virtue.