Donets

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Donets

(dənyĕts`), river, c.650 mi (1,050 km) long, in Ukraine and SW European Russia. A tributary of the Don, it is also called the North Donets (Rus. Severny Donets). It rises NE of Belgorod, which it passes, and flows generally southeast to join the lower Don. Its lower course is navigable.

Donets

 

an ancient Russian city of the 10th-14th centuries, now an archaeological site on the outskirts of Kharkov, (Ukrainian SSR) on a high promontory of the right bank of the Uda River. Donets arose on the site of a Scythian settlement (fifth century B.C.) and an early Slavic town of the eighth-tenth centuries. It is mentioned in the Hypatian Chronicle for 1185. The city consisted of a kremlin (detinets), fortified by an earthen bank with a wooden wall, and a posad (merchants’ and artisans’ quarter) stretching 1.5 km along the shore. V. A. Gorodtsov (in 1902), A. S. Fedorovskii (in 1929-30), and B. A. Shramko (in 1955-61) conducted the principal excavations. Dwellings, farm structures, grain pits, a smithy, the remains of bronze foundries and bone-cutting workshops, and potters’ kilns were found.

REFERENCES

Danilevich, V. E. “Donetskoe gorodishche i gorod Donets.” In the collection Arkheologicheskaia letopis’ luzhnoi Rossii, nos. 4-5. Kiev, 1904.
Shramko, B. A. Drevnosti Severskogo Dontsa. Kharkov, 1962.
Fedorovs’kyi, O. “Arkheolohichni rozkopy v okolytsiakh Kharkova.” In the collection Khronika arkheologii ta mystetstva, part 1. Kiev, 1930.

Donets

a river rising in SW Russia, in the Kursk steppe and flowing southeast, through Ukraine, to the Don River. Length: about 1078 km (670 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
The principal Late Neolithic/Early Eneolithic regional groups are (FIGURE 1, TABLE 1: 15-31): the Dnieper-Donets culture of Mariupol type in the steppe river valleys between the Dnieper and Donets rivers (Telegin 1968; 1987; 1991; Telegin & Potekhina 1987); the Orlovka group on the middle Don/lower Volga (Mamontov 1974; Yudin 1988; 1998); the Rakushechni Yar group on the lower Don (Belanovskaya & Telegin 1996; Kiashko 1987; 1994); the Varfolomievka group in the Volga-Ural steppes (Yudin 1988; 1998); and the Khvalynsk culture on the lower Volga with its related cousins such as S'ezzhye in the Samara region (Vasiliev 1981; Vasiliev & Matveeva 1979; Agapov et al.