Dong Son Culture


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Dong Son Culture

 

a developed Bronze Age culture (sixth-first centuries B.C.) widespread principally in North Vietnam. It was named after a settlement and burial site near the village of Dong Son (province of Thanh Hoa, Democratic Republic of Vietnam), which was excavated from 1924 to 1928, from 1934 to 1939, and in 1961. The burial ground at Thieu Duong (excavated by archaeologists of the DRV from 1960 to 1965) is also typical of the Dong Son culture. The culture is characterized by bronze articles of high craftsmanship (ritual drums decorated with drawings, daggers, knives, axes). Stone tools, pottery made using a potter’s wheel, clay models of dwellings, and some iron articles have also been found. The people of the Dong Son culture were familiar with irrigated farming. Anthropologically, the people of the culture were related to the southern Mongoloids and, to a lesser extent, to the Australo Negritos. The Dong Son culture is presumably linked to the Lac Viets, the predecessors of the contemporary Vietnamese, who were in the transitional stage from the primitive communal system to an early form of class society.

REFERENCE

Narody Iguo-Vostochnoi Azii. Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
The so-called Dong Son Culture starting about 800 BC represents a major technological achievement in which the proto-Viet race created more than 200 bronze kettledrums of Heger I type.
And until Western Han rule was replaced by Eastern Han in 24 BC, the traditional Dong Son Culture appears to have continued below the prefecture level (Nguyen Khac Su 2004, p.
In effect, Vietnam, overshadowed by the belief that the Dong Son culture was the result of cultural diffusion from China in the north and the fascination with the Hinduization process and the "Indonesian" world in the south, received "little attention in her own rights" (Davidson 1979, p.
In regard to the Dong Son culture, its "roots" may well extend back to at least 1000 BC, antedating any significant Chou influence.
For example, Jeremy Davidson, who in his survey of archaeological activity in both northern and southern Vietnam from 1954 to 1970, may have pursued too enthusiastically the conclusion of North Vietnamese archaeological findings; that the Phung Nguyen culture not only provided the genesis for the Van Lang kingdom of the Dong Son period to have existed in 2800 BC, but also provided the framework that the Cham and Khmer cultures of southern Vietnam could have been receivers of Dong Son culture (Davidson 1979).
This collection of later art of the Dong Son culture and the early period of the Chinese colonisation of Vietnam, formed by the collector-dealer Pham Lan Huong, includes bronze perfume burners, lamps and pitchers.
The ceramics date from the earliest period, the Dong Son culture of the 5th-1st century BC, to the 19th century.