Donor


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Related to Donor: organ donor, Donor atom, Sperm donor

donor

1. Med any person who voluntarily gives blood, skin, a kidney etc., for use in the treatment of another person
2. Law
a. a person who makes a gift of property
b. a person who bestows upon another a power of appointment over property
3. Chemistry the atom supplying both electrons in a coordinate bond
4. Physics an impurity, such as antimony or arsenic, that is added to a semiconductor material in order to increase its n-type conductivity by contributing free electrons

Donor

 

in medieval and Renaissance art and sometimes in the art of later periods, a representation of the builder of the church holding a model of the structure in his hands or of the patron who had ordered the painting, more rarely, sculpture or work of decorative applied art. The donor usually stands before Christ and the Virgin Mary or the saints.


Donor

 

a person giving his own blood for transfusion, or tissue (for example, skin) or an organ (for example, a kidney) for transplantation in a patient (the recipient). At the present stage of science the most widely found form of donation is blood donation. In the USSR donation is a voluntary act. Any healthy (according to a special medical examination), physically mature person 18 years of age and older can become a donor. The giving of blood is harmless for the donor. The health of the donor is protected, and in the USSR the donors have benefits. They are permitted to leave work with pay in order to give blood, and after giving blood they receive a day off with pay from the institution where they are employed. Donors are the first to receive permits to stay at sanatoriums and rest homes. The Executive Committee of the Red Cross and Red Crescent has established an award for donors, the badge Honorary Donor of the USSR.

donor

[′dō·nər]
(solid-state physics)
An impurity that is added to a pure semiconductor material to increase the number of free electrons. Also known as donor impurity; electron donor.
References in periodicals archive ?
But on the other hand it has a risk of transmitting infectious diseases and causing complications in the recipient as well as the donor if the criteria of safe blood donation and blood transfusion are not met.
Blood donors were evaluated on the basis of donor history questionnaire, physical examination, haemoglobin (Hb) estimation, pulse rate, blood pressure (BP) and temperature.
Help the donor discover ways to personally identify with the nonprofit and its purpose.
Andrews, the biotech expert at Chicago-Kent College of Law, says a nonprofit has asked her for legal advice on the extent to which it must inform donor families that tissue will be sold for profit.
Additionally, the donor will need to file a Form 709 gift tax return for the year assets are contributed to the CRT.
Donor-managed investment account: The donor funds a separate account within a charity and retains management privileges.
Donor recipients, from left, Glenda Rosenbloom, Ron Taubman and Jackie Colleran hope others will have successes like theirs through the state's new donor-organ registration program.
Some institutions have been more successful at approaching donors about funding paid internships, study abroad programs, or other experiential learning opportunities, rather than pure scholarship programs.
Commenters specifically cited policies that include donor evaluation, informed consent, evaluation of surgical outcomes and complications, protection of living donors, peri-operative care, organ allocation, qualifications of transplant programs, and transplant program compliance with living donor policies.
All four agencies had no donor information and no donor analysis," said the audit.
When tests show that their nephron numbers are marginal, Brenner advocates transplanting kidneys from brain-dead donors in pairs, and hence delivering more nephrons.
Donor infection and primary nonfunction in liver transplantation.