Donor


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Related to Donor: organ donor, Donor atom, Sperm donor

donor

1. Med any person who voluntarily gives blood, skin, a kidney etc., for use in the treatment of another person
2. Law
a. a person who makes a gift of property
b. a person who bestows upon another a power of appointment over property
3. Chemistry the atom supplying both electrons in a coordinate bond
4. Physics an impurity, such as antimony or arsenic, that is added to a semiconductor material in order to increase its n-type conductivity by contributing free electrons

Donor

 

in medieval and Renaissance art and sometimes in the art of later periods, a representation of the builder of the church holding a model of the structure in his hands or of the patron who had ordered the painting, more rarely, sculpture or work of decorative applied art. The donor usually stands before Christ and the Virgin Mary or the saints.


Donor

 

a person giving his own blood for transfusion, or tissue (for example, skin) or an organ (for example, a kidney) for transplantation in a patient (the recipient). At the present stage of science the most widely found form of donation is blood donation. In the USSR donation is a voluntary act. Any healthy (according to a special medical examination), physically mature person 18 years of age and older can become a donor. The giving of blood is harmless for the donor. The health of the donor is protected, and in the USSR the donors have benefits. They are permitted to leave work with pay in order to give blood, and after giving blood they receive a day off with pay from the institution where they are employed. Donors are the first to receive permits to stay at sanatoriums and rest homes. The Executive Committee of the Red Cross and Red Crescent has established an award for donors, the badge Honorary Donor of the USSR.

donor

[′dō·nər]
(solid-state physics)
An impurity that is added to a pure semiconductor material to increase the number of free electrons. Also known as donor impurity; electron donor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The continued work of Donor Alliance to facilitate organ, eye and tissue donation in our communities is extremely important," said Colorado resident Nicolle Llewellyn, whose daughter Taylor became an organ donor after her death last year.
This can be strengthened by developing a greater understanding of the donor's interests and values and demonstrating that the donor and the organization share key values and a vision of "what could be.
Udoff, who is an expert in donor egg IVF treatment, a counselor who works with donor egg IVF patients and is a donor egg mother herself, and a successful UK donor egg patient.
A 2001 report from the Department of Health and Human Services found that "tissue banking and processing practices have gradually diverged from donor families' expectations.
If a trustee has been investing for growth to defer income, this rule could severely limit the amount of income the donor would be able to receive from the trust.
Establishment of a donor-advised fund at a community foundation or financial institution: The donor gets an immediate tax deduction at FMV.
A lot of people in the state's four major organ-procurement organizations are getting goose bumps because of the number of Californians checking the box when they renew their driver's license, agreeing to be an organ and tissue donor.
The majority of respondents indicated that OPTN living donor guidelines should be given the same status of other OPTN policies," HRSA said in the Federal Register notice.
Information should include cost-per-dollar raised, goal versus realized revenue, number of donors, new donor acquisition, donor retention, repeat donors, average gift, payment method, year-over-year comparison, among others.
That same percentage failed among untested kidneys obtained from donors under age 60.
However, bacterial antigens, endotoxin, and cytokines could potentially be sequestered in a donor liver, especially when organ transplantation occurs within days of the bacteremic episode.