dormouse

(redirected from Dormice)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Dormice: Gliridae

dormouse,

name for Old World nocturnal rodentsrodent,
member of the mammalian order Rodentia, characterized by front teeth adapted for gnawing and cheek teeth adapted for chewing. The Rodentia is by far the largest mammalian order; nearly half of all mammal species are rodents.
..... Click the link for more information.
 of the family Gliridae. There are many dormouse species, classified in several genera. Many resemble small squirrels. Dormice sleep deeply during the day, and European species hibernate for nearly six months of the year; their name is derived from the French dormir, "to sleep." Best known is the common dormouse, or hazelmouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, of Europe and W Asia, which resembles a mouse with a bushy tail. It is up to 4 in. (10 cm) long excluding the 2-in. (5-cm) tail, with rounded ears, large eyes, and thick, soft, reddish brown fur. Social animals, hazelmice build neighboring nests of leaves and grasses in bushes and thickets. They feed on insects, berries, seeds, and nuts, and are especially partial to hazelnuts. The European, or fat, dormouse, Glis glis, is the largest of the family reaching a length of 8 in. (20 cm) excluding the tail; it has a very thick coat of grayish fur and becomes extremely fat in autumn. It is found in forested regions of Europe and W Asia and lives in hollow trees. The ancient Romans raised it in captivity for food. There are many dormouse species in Africa. The spiny dormice of S Asia belong to a different rodent family, the Platacanthomyidae; they have spines mixed with their fur. The desert dormouse (Selevinia betpakolalensis) is placed in its own family, Seleviniidae. True dormice are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Rodentia, family Gliridae.

dormouse

[′dȯr‚mau̇s]
(vertebrate zoology)
The common name applied to members of the family Gliridae; they are Old World arboreal rodents intermediate between squirrels and rats.

dormouse

snoozes all through the mad tea-party. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
See: Sleep

dormouse

any small Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, esp the Eurasian Muscardinus avellanarius, resembling a mouse with a furry tail
References in periodicals archive ?
The fasted dormice showed considerably greater use of torpor, enabling them to maintain high growth rates and accumulate sufficient fat reserves.
Once the sun sets, fat dormice go to work stuffing themselves full of beech seeds until they grow fat.
A Squirrels do not hibernate in the true sense of the word in the way that bats and dormice do.
WILLIAMS, Marcia The Romans, Gods, Emperors and Dormice Walker, 2013 unpaged $29.
Northumberland Wildlife Trust chief executive Mike Pratt, said: "From cuckoos to curlews, dormice to daisies, they are precious and we strive to conserve them, every last one of them, which is no mean feat given the size of the area we cover.
Mainly found in Europe, dormice take naps that last for more than half a year
DORMICE have been found in a North Wales wood for the first time since the 1990s.
London, June 15 (ANI): British archaeologists digging a giant septic tank at an ancient city, which was destroyed by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius, have found that dormice, sea urchins, and fresh figs were among some of the delicacies enjoyed by Romans.
PTES development officer Nida Al-Fulaij said: "This marks the 17th reintroduction in our programme which has taken place across 12 English counties, with more than 635 dormice being released over the last 16 years.
TAKE A LOOK: Dormice, weasels and many more creatures make their homes in the miles of Britain's hedgerows
Other creatures on the EU's list include dormice and great crested newts, plus Killarney fern and Lady's slipper.
DORMICE, bats and butterflies are among the much-loved species that will need help moving to new habitats as climate change brings warmer temperatures to Britain.