Dostoevsky


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Dostoevsky

, Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoyevski
Fyodor Mikhailovich . 1821--81, Russian novelist, the psychological perception of whose works has greatly influenced the subsequent development of the novel. His best-known works are Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), The Possessed (1871), and The Brothers Karamazov (1879--80)
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The task of the competition is to support projects of interdisciplinary scientific research into the heritage of FM Dostoevsky and its significance in Russian and world culture, to study the problems of textology, to expand the source research base, to apply natural science methods and digital technologies in studying his biography and creativity.
Critical interest in the link between Dickens and Dostoevsky has deep roots, dating back to the nineteenth-century critic George Gissing, who noted, "Not seldom in reading Dostoevsky one is reminded of Dickens, even of Dickens's peculiarities of humour" (qtd.
Dostoevsky was not a philosopher; he was a philosophically and religiously oriented fiction writer.
Dostoevsky's letters, as well as his preparatory material, reveal his careful reading of Cervantes, and through this reading Dostoevsky certainly came to see some of the literary weaknesses of Myshkin.
She perceptively links this meaning of the title to Woolf's quotation from Dostoevsky in Chapter 10 of Night and Day: "It's life that matters, nothing but life--the process of discovering--the everlasting and perpetual process, not the discovery itself at all.
I am surprised by the number of Turkish university students who have read Russian literary works such as Leo Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.
In this sense, Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-81) was such an ethical writer and Mikhail Bakhtin who discovered it was an ethical critic.
For Bakhtin, the blinkered, at times solipsistic existence of Tolstoy's characters presents a stark contrast to the expansive and interpenetrative universe modeled in the fiction of Fyodor Dostoevsky, an author whose work Bakhtin describes as uniquely "polyphonic":
Donald Richie, one of the most perceptive critics of Kurosawa in the English-speaking world, asserts that Kurosawa's blind worship of Dostoevsky restricted the film's creative potential.
Clearly, my knowledge of Russia, prejudiced by a love of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy and the experience of being taken at gunpoint from Moscow airport and inexplicably locked up for 24 hours, is sadly limited
More than almost any novelist, Dostoevsky is able to give his reader the feeling: 'He knows my secret thoughts; he is writing about me'" (Complete Works, ed.