Dostoevsky


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Dostoevsky

, Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoyevski
Fyodor Mikhailovich . 1821--81, Russian novelist, the psychological perception of whose works has greatly influenced the subsequent development of the novel. His best-known works are Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), The Possessed (1871), and The Brothers Karamazov (1879--80)
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7] Straus engages with Bakhtin's readings of Dostoevsky in a feminist argument that postulates Raskolnikov's dependence upon the voices of other characters in the formation of his own.
In all these ways, although it seems unlikely, Anya prepares for, by contextualising, the narrator's closing paean to "Mother Russia" in general and to Dostoevsky in particular as literary authority.
Like Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky too links beauty with extreme situations of anguish and suffering.
One of the things I noticed, however, is that most of the major scholars on Dostoevsky are still alive and many are from New England," he said.
Derjani's solution to the difficulties of reconciling Dostoevsky to the theater is to use minimalist stage elements devised for the absurdist theater of Samuel Beckett and his contemporaries.
For Bellow as for Dostoevsky, it seems, there is no
The fear that a fusion of Catholicism and socialism might be effected, as the former strove to retain its temporal dominance in an age of secular ascendancy, haunted Dostoevsky for years before he distilled it into the allegory of the Legend.
Ivanits begins with a useful chapter on early Dostoevsky and his exposure to the Russian people and Russian folklore.
Dostoevsky Follows Karamzin's Traveler into Europe: The Manipulation of Karamzin's Germany
Yet, it is disconcerting to find out that Joseph Frank, the famous Dostoevsky scholar and bibliographer, has resented this fictionalised version of the Russian writer's life: "Coetzee is a novelist, of course, and he has the novelist's right to play with history.
Isn't that what Dostoevsky grasped--the critical force of neutral description?
THE ABOVE QUOTE, commonly attributed to Fyodor Dostoevsky, not only was never written by him (see a lengthy examination on the Secular Web at www.