Dostoevsky

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Dostoevsky

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Fyodor Mikhailovich . 1821--81, Russian novelist, the psychological perception of whose works has greatly influenced the subsequent development of the novel. His best-known works are Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), The Possessed (1871), and The Brothers Karamazov (1879--80)
References in periodicals archive ?
El mismo Dostoyevski en su Diario de un escritor (1877) propone la union de toda la intelliguentsia rusa bajo el signo del quijotismo con la base comun de la fe en la humanidad (Bagno, "Russkoie donkijotstvo" 218).
But the rest of the city continues to crumble, and the dark back alleys described by Dostoyevski are more sinister than ever--except now they reek of alcohol and vomit.
To these associations might be added Dostoyevski (whose "buffoon" for Christ in The Idiot is matched by Endo's Gaston Bonaparte in Wonderful Fool) and perhaps sixth century B.
In letters to friends, Latimer discusses Pirandello, Henry James, Joyce, Proust, Dostoyevski, and Gide.
But occupants of the "house of the dead" (as Dostoyevski called prisoners and convicts) having broken away, alas, quickly lose the lost vestiges of human appearance.
To review human reflection about evil is to review the entire history of theology, philosophy, religion, and literature, from the Rig Veda to Plato to Dostoyevski to Wittgenstein.
In it, Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevski painted a brilliant picture of the rationale for authoritarianism.
Just think of it," says Lance Dostoyevski, who produces many of the infomercials seen on late-night cable TV.
Millet" (73rd Nation), "Copte Dostoyevski Buldum" (I Found Dostoyevski in Garbage Can), "Ben ve Nuri Baba" (Nuri Baba and I), "Kursun Kalem" (Pencil), and "5 No'lu Cezaevi" (Prison No.
Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Yeats, Melville, Sir Philip Sydney's Arcadia, Sigmund Freud, Wilhelm Stekel, Theodor Reik, Jung, Joseph Campbell, Don Quixote, Plutarch's Lives, Apuleius' The Golden Ass, Uncle Remus, Proust, Joyce, Laurence Sterne, Cervantes, and all of Dickens, Dostoyevski, Tolstoy, and Pasternak.
Crime and Punishment" by Dostoyevski and "Grapes of Wrath" by Steinbeck speak to the conscience and hearts of all people.