dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, but it's not the Dot Com Bubble at the turn of the century I'm talking about.
Paul Callaghan, chairman of Sunderland software business Leighton Group, will draw on his business experience spanning three recessions and a dot com bubble to explain his strategy for survival.
Following the collapse of the dot com bubble, confidence weakened.
Significantly Newport Networks is the first pre-revenue technology company to float on AIM since the dot com bubble burst.
This compares with a peak of 6930 touched in December 1999 at the height of the dot com bubble.
Then the collapse of the dot com bubble triggered a massive fall in the value of its newly-acquired assets just as its customers cut spending.
The memory of the dot com bubble and burst just five years ago is still fresh.
Since the dot com bubble burst in March 2000, triggering wild swings in the stock market, shares in Man have jumped from 800p to as high as pounds 13.
THE dramatic collapse of the dot com bubble has created a new breed of job seeker for whom unemployment no longer carries a stigma, according to a leading employment specialist.
The industry shows no signs of forcefully breaking out of its malaise that started with the end of the dot com bubble era in April 2000 and the subsequent ongoing retrenchment of the financial services industry.
It was then hit by a massive fall in demand for new telecoms equipment after the dot com bubble burst in March 2000.
This achievement reflects a shift in the marketplace away from the distorting effects of the dot com bubble and other economic challenges to a time when companies are spending more responsibly and looking for medium to long-term returns on investment.