dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of casual dressing began to take hold in the 1970s and picked up pace in the dot-com boom years of the late 1990s, with tech entrepreneurs coming from the school "you either wear a suit or you know what you're doing.
Investors just remember how many of the business models from the dot-com boom failed.
Placed in the context of the dot-com boom this is an inside look at both the person and the wider business and computational community in which he operated.
On Tuesday, it closed above 4,000 for the first time since the end of the dot-com boom in 2000.
Many years ago, around the time of the dot-com boom, an idea occurred to me for a different type of protagonist: a security analyst who applied his/her talents to solving financial crimes.
Priceline, which was welped during the dot-com boom but has grown into the world's most valuable online travel agency, said Thursday it has offered to buy Kayak for $40 a share.
Apple topped the record of nearly $ 619 billion set by software titan Microsoft in 1999, during the famed dot-com boom years.
When I became editor of Arkansas Business in 1999, in the waning days of the dot-com boom and the age of the IPO, Arkansas was home to 31 publicly traded companies.
Smaller firms involved in the industry have also begun to follow suit, though they have moved more conservatively than during Manhattan's dot-com boom in the late 1990s and early 2000s, a trend noted in a recent story in The Real Deal.
Most are taking space in the four- and five-figure square footage range, less than the six figures many Internet start-ups were taking during the dot-com boom 10 years ago.
This time period has encompassed a great deal of change, if not turmoil: the dot-com boom in the late 1990s, the drop in the market that followed, the uptick in the market in the mid-2000s, the stock crash of late 2008 and early 2009, and the recovery in more recent months.
on Monday closed GeoCities, a free Web hosting service that it purchased for over three billion dollars at the height of the dot-com boom.