dot-com bubble

(redirected from Dot-com crash)

dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Schwab Center for Financial Research reviewed how $2,000 invested annually between 1993 and 2012 (a period that included the dot-com crash and the global financial crisis) would have grown based on the investor's long-term strategy.
The firm attracts such blue-chip stalwarts as Steelcase (still a bellwether client after 17 years), Duke University, GE, Aon and other brick-and-mortar corporations that enable it to survive the dot-com crash.
It was at the time of the dot-com crash, and I thought it would be something I would do for a year and then sell it.
But he comes with a flawless track record of spotting the dot-com crash and the subprime housing crisis as the last two major US investment bubbles.
As a company, we have moved with the times and we've successfully navigated some serious business and world events like the dot-com crash, 9/11, and the 2007 recession.
support, dried up financially with the dot-com crash.
After the dot-com crash in 2000, many dismissed the Internet as a viable general business platform.
It is something we have seen before in the 2000 dot-com crash and the Asian financial crisis.
It is something we have seen before in the 2000 dot-com crash and the Asian financial crisis," he told the Gulf Daily News, our sister publication .
The investment plans were designed to exploit tax breaks introduced after the dot-com crash to promote investment in software and technology.
In fact, lessons were learned by technology companies in the dot-com crash.
Just as Alan Greenspan didn't really fix the problem of the dot-com crash by inflating the housing bubble, neither has Ben Bernanke solved the problem of the housing crash by creating more than $1 trillion out of thin air with which to buy government debt and "toxic" derivative assets.