dot-com company

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dot-com company

An organization that offers its services exclusively on the Internet, either via the user's Web browser or a client program that must be installed in the user's computer. Amazon.com, Yahoo, Google and eBay are examples of dot-com companies. Telecom companies that offer voice or video services over the Internet also fit into the dot-com company umbrella.

But, Doesn't All Software Access the Internet?
Today, almost all software accesses the Internet for some purpose, if only to look for updates that can be downloaded. However, that does not necessarily make the company a dot-com company. The software or service must be hosted on the company's computers and accessed by users over the Internet. See dot-com.
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and Canadian operations, became intrigued with a dot-com start-up after the two founders asked him to review their business plan and make recommendations.
The company's clients include Forbes Global-2000 companies, international IT software development companies and dot-com start-ups.
THERE'S still money to be made from the internet, despite the gloomy economic situation and dot-com start-ups losing their lustre.
Instead of taking over or transforming traditional business, it seems that smaller dot-com start-ups will have to find their own well-defined niches in the market.
Successful dot-com start-ups could become takeover targets as the ASP market continues to mature.
While the dot-com start-ups fight for a piece of the online insurance pie, traditional insurance companies will use their established brand names and capital to grab their share.
This is especially attractive for dot-com start-ups, which are being more frugal with cash.
Dot-com start-ups and organizations entering into internet ventures for agribusiness are unique clients requiring specialized approaches.
But their mania to fund dot-com start-ups may have blinded them from financing an industry many believe is about to explode: "green businesses," or environmental friendly companies.
To make the best personal decision about the kind of Internet company to join--or whether to,join one at all--CPAs should think about whether they would be comfortable working in the chaotic atmosphere that prevails at most dot-com start-ups.
Not only are the dot-com start-ups arriving at the Licensing Show armed to the teeth with technological innovation, but LIMA has reported a jump in membership.
In 2000, e-market makers in Asia/Pacific will be targeted for direct investment from commercial banks and venture capital funds expanding their e-business portfolios from the narrow focus on dot-com start-ups seen in the region to date.