dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
New home sales fall sharply before all recessions (with the exception of the dot.
On first blush this might sound like the pie-in-the-sky promises by companies in the heady days before the dot.
It was at Digital Equipment where STORServer's founders were working at the onset of the dot.
In the past decade, ever optimistic Americans have few major adjustments in their free-spending lifestyles, even through the shocks of a dot.
Ironically, much of the financial turmoil over the past five-six years has emanated from America when you consider the impact of the dot.
Officials say the route is losing money and blame the poor results in part on the dot.
In theory, online grocery delivery businesses should fare better in Latin America than they did in the United States, where many flopped with the dot.
It would also be interesting to compare the blue-collar worker unemployment of the 1980s with the recent dot.
One of the biggest myths of 2001 was that innovation was dying along with the dot.
Lance Hamel knows firsthand about the IT labor market--which continues to be tight despite the layoffs caused by the economic slowdown and dot.
The quantitative meltdown of August 2007 brought massive losses and correlation at the tails, changing the market for quant funds that had ruled as market king since the dot.
This week's unnerving stock market sell-off has prompted Mike Lenhoff at Brewin Dolphin to take a look at the ruinous bear market of 1973/74 and the more recent dot.