dot-com company

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dot-com company

An organization that offers its services exclusively on the Internet, either via the user's Web browser or a client program that must be installed in the user's computer. Amazon.com, Yahoo, Google and eBay are examples of dot-com companies. Telecom companies that offer voice or video services over the Internet also fit into the dot-com company umbrella.

But, Doesn't All Software Access the Internet?
Today, almost all software accesses the Internet for some purpose, if only to look for updates that can be downloaded. However, that does not necessarily make the company a dot-com company. The software or service must be hosted on the company's computers and accessed by users over the Internet. See dot-com.
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Rich Dotcom, not-so-thrilled to be back in his prison garb, tries to sweet talk a skeptical Jane," he says of the two characters' photo inside the interrogation room.
Given the stakes of this case, the losing party will likely appeal any adverse judgment to the Court of Appeal," said Ira Rothken, a lawyer representing Dotcom, in an email.
Dotcom seems bent on exposing what he calls incompetencies in the whole process.
The dramatic arrest of Dotcom by armed police at the Auckland mansion almost four years ago triggered a chain of events that cost at least one Cabinet minister his job.
The hearing has been postponed 10 times since Dotcom was arrested in
Dotcom currently resides in New Zealand, where he is
But Dotcom may fall short of one of his main goals: getting center-right Prime Minister John Key voted out of office.
According to the report, Dotcom cautioned against using U.
Twelve months later, Dotcom and his co-accused from the Megaupload site took to a stage at his home to officially launch a new service, mega.
Megaupload, which Dotcom started in 2005, was one of the most popular sites on the Web until U.
Potter's ruling coincided with a report by New Zealand's inspector general of intelligence and security, requested by Prime Minister John Key, on unlawful surveillance of Dotcom and Bram van der Kolk, Megaupload's head programmer, by the country's Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB).