dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shih compared the rapid inflation of Bitcoin to famous historic economic bubbles, like Tulip mania, the Mississippi Bubble, the South Sea Bubble, and the Dotcom Bubble, and stated that if the Bitcoin bubble bursts it may be the largest bubble to ever pop in history.
In a statement on February 7th, Goldman Sachs predicted the value of cryptocurrencies would fail and its value would erode to zero and comparisons to the dotcom bubble of the late 1990's were made.
For instance, during the Dotcom bubble, there was a surge of tech IPOs as many investors were eager to invest (301 IPOs at its peak).
Second, the dotcom bubble of the early 2000s taught us that far more start-ups fail than actually succeed in the technology space.
Lee Byung-tae, a professor at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), also said cryptocurrencies and blockchain cannot be handled separately, adding that there would be no Naver, Amazon and Google without the dotcom bubble.
As the dotcom bubble proved, even the most exciting long-term technology can also inflict grievous long-term losses on you if it gets sufficiently overvalued.
The rally in prices is seen despite some people calling it a bubble comparing it with 16th century Tulip Mania or even a dotcom bubble.
SETTING THE WORLD TO RIGHTS, ONE DAY AT A TIME TWENTY years ago, as the first dotcom bubble began to swell, the term "Millennium Bug" passed into common usage.
Tom Adams, the editor-in-chief of the San Francisco-based cannabis market research firm, compared the industry's rapid growth to the dotcom bubble of the early aughts.
But their value slumped after the dotcom bubble burst in 2001 and they were soon overtaken by Google.
The former technology entrepreneur became an active philanthropist after selling his electronic brokerage CyBerCorp to Charles Schwab for $488 million in early 2000, just weeks before the dotcom bubble burst.
6 set on December 30 1999, just before the dotcom bubble burst.