dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anyone invested since the late 1990s will have seen wave after wave of market crises hit the investment shoreline - the dotcom bubble, the aftershock of 9/11, the collapse of the mortgage-backed securities market which lead to the financial crisis in 2008/2009, Europe's problems in 2011, and now we have Greece and potentially China - but, to continue the analogy, the shoreline always adapts to the changes imposed upon it.
Average value per disclosed-value deal did soar to an all-time record, including the dotcom bubble.
According to EY s Global technology M&A update: October-December 2014, corporate technology dealmakers backed away from big-ticket deals in 4Q14, but, nonetheless, full-year 2014 set M&A volume and value records that were surpassed only in 2000, at the height of the dotcom bubble.
Then, during the Dotcom bubble I worked for one of Wales' first Dotcom businesses, an online information computer technology (ICT) trading service.
Andy, who began his career at the World Bank, is something of an economic fortune-teller: he predicted the bursting of the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, the 2000 dotcom bubble and 2008 credit bubble, all of his predictions being published in influential publications worldwide.
The bursting of the dotcom bubble ranks among investment history's greatest debacles.
Think of the past decades -- the Long-term Capital Management bailout, the dotcom bubble, the aftermath of the dotcom bubble, the housing bubble and finally, the "rescue" of the economy in the wake of the financial crisis.
Sources close to the deal rated its value as in line with its 2011 valuation, but investors remain wary after getting their fingers burned when the dotcom bubble burst in 2000.
God said, "I need someone who will take money from the people who work and save, and use that money to create a dotcom bubble and a housing bubble and a stock bubble and an oil bubble and a commodities bubble and a bond bubble and another stock bubble, and then sell it to people in Poughkeepsie and Spokane and Bakersfield, and pay himself another bonus.
Despite fears of a repeat of the burst of the dotcom bubble in 2000, the sector is currently thriving.
Back in early 2000 at the height of the dotcom bubble, experts predicted a Dow Jones index to hit 50,000 by 2020.
Buffett also refuted claims that financial markets are in a second dotcom bubble.