dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was a period when outsourcing caught on and the dotcom crash hit.
The report said that AltaVista was sold off in 1999 to a venture capital firm who prepared an IPO that was abandoned in the wake of the dotcom crash of 2001 and was later bought by Overture in 2003 and Yahoo acquired it a year later.
Nonsensical valuations in emerging markets will vanish, just as they did in the Dotcom crash.
amp;nbsp; The demand remains high but fears are settling in that it may be overpriced  signaling a bubble and reminders of dotcom crash experiences in the past.
In 2000 for instance, the dotcom bubble took off, which saw people buying technology funds at its peak, only to be very quickly disappointed when the dotcom crash happened.
This core belief, which Potter built on from his experience as General Manager at CarMax, was key to CarDirect's ability to weather the dotcom crash and evolve into today's successful public company, Internet Brands, Inc.
Jake Zamansky, an attorney who pursued investment banks after the dotcom crash on behalf of investors, predicted Deloitte would ultimately comply with the subpoena.
The huge figure is bound to stoke fears about a new dotcom crash and even the US Securities and Exchange Commission is beginning to get interested.
For instance, globally, the dotcom crash wiped out $5 trillion in market value for technology companies from March 2000 to October 2002.
In the same way that the dotcom crash didn't put an end to the internet, the recent property crash does not mean the market for housing is gone.
This dire performance even surpasses the 25% slide witnesses in the midst of the dotcom crash of 2002.