Dotheboys Hall

Dotheboys Hall

Mr. Squeers’s school: no extras, no vacations. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
References in classic literature ?
At Mr Wackford Squeers's Academy, Dotheboys Hall, at the delightful village of Dotheboys, near Greta Bridge in Yorkshire, Youth are boarded, clothed, booked, furnished with pocket-money, provided with all necessaries, instructed in all languages living and dead, mathematics, orthography, geometry, astronomy, trigonometry, the use of the globes, algebra, single stick (if required), writing, arithmetic, fortification, and every other branch of classical literature.
Unfortunately, Ralph exploits the grieving Nicklebys and sends Nicholas away to Dotheboys Hall, a school in Yorkshire run by the abusive Wackford Squeers (Jim Broadbent).
I hear this suggestion has gained the enthusiastic backing of respected educationists such as Wackford Squeers of Dotheboys Hall.
Rest assured as the new year dawns, Mr Bumble, Rhodri Morgan, ably assisted by the artful Plaid bloke, along with the rest of the gang down at Dotheboys Hall, will conjure up even more obscene schemes to pick the pockets of the sorely pressed citizens of the Principality.
Ralph finds work for Kate with the dressmaker Madame Mantalini and for Nicholas at Dotheboys Hall, a horrific boarding school where the illegitimate children of the gentry can be offloaded to remote Yorkshire.
It's a cross between a small stately home and Dotheboys Hall.
It was the face of a schoolboy who has long trained himself not to cry under punishment and who has had endless chances to practice, like an inmate at Dotheboys Hall.
Even the audience-pleasing conclusion of the Crummles version of "Romeo and Juliet," in which the lovers leap into each other's arms, was sacrificed for the sake of establishing a deeper emotional tie between Nicholas and Smike (Jamie Bell), the crippled boy he rescues from Dotheboys Hall.
The evil Mr Squeers and his wife run a brutal boarding school for boys, Dotheboys Hall, in Yorkshire where Nicholas Nickleby (played by James D'Arcy) is sent by his uncle Ralph (played by Charles Dance) to teach and is suitably appalled by what he sees.
His lighting played a big part in transporting us from the city streets of London to the wilds of Yorkshire and back again, from gentlemen's clubs to private sitting rooms to the horrors of Dotheboys Hall.
The 'Nicholas Nickleby' of 1903 follows the more usual pattern of early Dickens adaptations of focusing on one well-known episode - in this case the scene at Dotheboys Hall where Nicholas attacks the bullying schoolmaster Squeers and rescues the maltreated Smike.