Douai

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Douai

(do͞o`ā, do͞oā`), town (1990 pop. 44,195), Nord dept., N France, in French Flanders, on the Scarpe River. It is a major industrial and commercial center in what formerly was the northern coal region. The chief industries are foundry products, automobile parts, glass, chemicals, and printing.

Probably a Roman fortress (Duacum) built in the 4th cent., Douai was a possession of the counts of Flanders during the Middle Ages. Because of its prosperity as a center of the cloth trade, the town received a charter (1228) granting some autonomy. With the Hundred Years War (1337–1453) and the resulting curtailment of English wool imports, the town declined and passed in 1384 to the dukes of Burgundy and in 1477 to the Spanish Hapsburgs. Louis XIV seized Douai in 1667, and after the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14), the town was permanently restored to France by the Peace of Utrecht (1713).

Points of interest include the town hall (15th cent.); the belfry (14th cent.); the Palace of Justice (16th and 18th cent.); and St. Peter's Church (16th and 18th cent.). Under the patronage of Philip II of Spain, a Roman Catholic college was established in Douai for English priests. At the college the Old Testament of the Douay Bible was prepared in 1609.

Douai

an industrial city in N France: the political and religious centre of exiled English Roman Catholics in the 16th and 17th centuries. Pop.: 42 796 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
Dans ses toiles, Otman Douay obtient un effet analogue et une vibration particuliere grace a la juxtaposition de touches interdependantes.
Even the (Catholic) Douay version in English, which appeared in 1610 and was used until 1964, did not transliterate Y-H-V-H, since the Douay version was based on the Vulgate.
Probably Tolkien would have been influenced by the Challoner revision of the Douay Translation, not the King James directly--nor, for that matter, the Coverdale translation used in The Book of Common Prayer; however the revised Douay and the King James are close enough that the imitation of either style would sound much the same.
The second plate, for example, communicates Kemble's supposedly 'Jewish' character through a combination of textual and graphic cues which interact through the subtitle of the design--'Blackjack not liking to be a Popish Priest returns from Douay in a state of Beggary & rages is releived [sic] by the poor strollers at Brecknock' [Plate 8].
We also went to the Cathedral of Salisbury and the Benedictine Abbey of Douay, where we prayed Vespers with the monks.
Bouhours-Nouet N, May-Panloup P, Coutant R, de Casson FB, Descamps P, Douay O, et al.
Further chapters trace the meteoric rise and development of the new expressive art form through other later works of Mendelssohn, Schumann, Douay, Berlioz, the French composer Felicien David, Franck, Scudo, Marx, and Wagner, and finally Lacombe, Weckerlin, Kastner, and Reyer.
The antecedent to a book of such totality can be found in the Apocalypse where there is "a book written within and without, sealed with seven seals" (5:1 "librum scriptum intus et foris signatum sigillis septem"), which when folded up "every mountain, and the islands were moved out of their places" (6: 14 "omnis mons et insulae de locis suis motae sunt) (Biblical passages are based on the Douay Rheims Bible).
Although previous research has shown that HSCs can be developed into fully matured red blood cells, this is the first study that has proven that they are capable of survival in the human body, a major breakthrough for the transplant community," said Luc Douay, MD, PhD, senior study author and Professor of Hematology at Universite Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France.
A first research study was conducted by Nicolas Douay (2007), who compared the metropolitan planning strategies of Montreal and Marseille.
La reflexion sur l'amenagement au Quebec sur la longue duree est poursuivie par Douay, Lewis et Trepanier.
Like them--though more innocently--the love poems rework their literary models; for personal feelings one should look to the poems "To his Friend beyond sea," Richard Bacon, Oldisworth's schoolfellow at Westminster, whose Catholicism would take him abroad to Douay.