Douglas-fir

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Douglas-fir

[¦dəg·ləs ′fər]
(botany)
Pseudotsuga menziesii. A large coniferous tree in the order Pinales; cones are characterized by bracts extending beyond the scales. Also known as red fir.
References in periodicals archive ?
This year's Wassail packaging features a postcard view of the Hood River Valley dusted with snow, with a snow-covered douglas-fir tree looms in the foreground and Ml.
A 37-foot Douglas-fir tree donated by Weyerhaeuser (NYSE:WY) will stand as the centerpiece on the Olympia Capitol Campus this holiday season.
A 100-foot Douglas-fir tree from Weyerhaeuser is en route to Kansas City, Mo.
Earlywood Latewood Vertical position Mean COV (%) (a) Mean COV (%) Douglas-fir Tree 0.
The distribution of Douglas-fir tree relative density from Canada, the United States, Europe, and New Zealand tends to be bell shaped with a mean between 0.
Internal moisture relations of standing Douglas-fir trees injected with organic arsenicals.
Together, the companies form an integrated forest products business that grows and harvests California redwood and Douglas-fir trees.
Back in early July of 1965," says Thompson, "Mauro and I planned the first aerial application of the virus on a few hundred four-foot-tall Douglas-fir trees in pots.
More recent studies have found that the LLAD of the first (butt) log in Douglas-fir trees can be predicted from the diameter of the largest limb in the breast height region (DLLBH; Briggs et al.
The process begins with scientists selecting superior Douglas-fir trees -- the predominant commercial tree species in western Washington -- and cross-breeding them to produce seeds containing outstanding qualities.
Douglas-fir trees approximately 45 to 50 years in age and 35 cm in diameter at breast height were harvested from plantation forest at the northern South Island of New Zealand.
In this study, mechanical properties and grade yield of structural products were estimated for 2 by 4 lumber cut from logs of small-diameter Douglas-fir trees from a stand in northern California.