Doves Press


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Doves Press

(dŭvs), one of the leaders in the revival of the art and craft of making books that occurred in the late 19th and early 20th cent. It was founded at Hammersmith, London, in 1900 by T. J. Cobden-Sanderson and Emery Walker, both of whom had been associated with William Morris in the work of the Kelmscott PressKelmscott Press,
printing establishment in London. There William Morris led the 19th-century revival of the art and craft of making books (see arts and crafts). The first book made by the press was The Story of the Glittering Plain (1891), by William Morris.
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. The masterpiece of the Doves Press was the Doves Bible (5 vol., 1903). The Doves type, suggested by type used by Nicolas Jenson in the 15th cent., was designed by Emery Walker. The work of the press ended in 1916, when Cobden-Sanderson prevented further use of the type by throwing it into the Thames.
References in periodicals archive ?
While this one book alone is expected to realise PS15,000 to PS20,000, the entire collection includes 13 crates of books, including a five-volume Doves Press version of the Holy Bible, published over three years from 1902-05.
That is until the final part of the collection revealed they were intended to go on top of a case that was never made for the Doves Press Bible.
Aside from his pervasive legacy as a teacher and author of a manual that has been often called "the calligrapher's bible," Johnston has left a body of beautiful lettering work, including initials for many Doves Press books and hand rubrication of one, as well as several typeface designs, most notably the influential Underground Sans design for the London Electric Railways, which led the way for a good many other sans serif designs based on historical proportions.
A process engraver, typographer and printer, he inspired and helped his friend Morris to set up the Kelmscott Press and then established the Doves Press with T.
During these years the interiors remained largely unchanged, although certain items had to be sold (not least the collection of Kelmscott and Doves Press publications, which went to Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museum).
Cobden-Sanderson, who founded the Doves Press with Emery Walker in 1900, stands out as a man of absolute principle and uncompromising ideals.
The Doves Press is her third book on Cobden-Sanderson.
Much came later from the Daniel Press, the Ashendene, the Golden Cockerel and the Doves press, all remarkable, all highly valuable today if only as a reminder of how distinguished these things were in the history of fine printing, where everything was carefully chosen, from the printing type to the paper, illustrations and final binding, with artists involved at every stage of production.
This volume joins an impressive series of histories of modern private presses issued by Oak Knoll and the British Library in 2003: A History of the Eragny Press, 1894-1914 by Marcella Ganz, The Doves Press by Marianne Tidcombe, andA History of the Golden Cockerel Press by Roderick Cave and Sarah Manson.
Cobden-Sanderson's disposal of the Doves Press type, the Daniel Press' publication of The Garland of Rachel, John Baptist Jackson's method of engraving using chiaroscuro, and the English Victorian book club, Ye Sette of Odd Volumes.
The Maggs catalogue, with its fine cover showing a binding made for the Doves Press ranges over some of the finest which ever came out of The Ashendene Press, The Golden Cockerel Press, The Kelmscott Press (William Morris, of course), The Nonesuch and Gwasg Gregynog.
The private presses with their limited editions from the Kelmscott, Erageragny, the Ashendene Press (one of the most aristocratic) the Doves Press and the Nonesuch are somewhere - and often in fine bindings - but they don't turn up here very often.