Dracaena


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Related to Dracaena: Dracaena draco

Dracaena

 

a genus of woody plants or shrubs of the family Agavaceae. There are about 150 species in the tropics and subtropics of the eastern hemisphere. The stems are branched; the leaves are linear or lanceolate, and the flowers are usually in panicles, with a simple, six-lobed white or yellowish perianth, six stamens, and pistils with three nidi. The fruit is a berry. The bark of certain species, such as the dragon tree, exudes a resinous red substance that is used to make lacquers. Many species, particularly those with varie-gated leaves (D. godseffiana, D. deremensis, and others), are raised in hothouses and indoors.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dracaena originates from the Greek word drakaina, meaning female dragon.
44 mg/ kg) or Dracaena arborea aqueous (500 mg/kg) and ethanol (100 mg/kg) extracts for three weeks.
Dracaena draco is native to the Canaries and although the species is present in five of its seven islands, its numbers are reduced to a few hundred - resulting in its conservation status being listed as "vulnerable".
Offline two-dimensional RP/RPLC method to separate components in Dracaena cochinchinensis (Lour.
We would drive home, our trunk full of red and pink geraniums, bright marigolds, an array of petunias and begonias, purple and white lobelia, spiky dracaena and silvery-soft dusty miller to mix into planters.
Besides flowers, different types of plants were also place, included Schefflera, Kalanchoe, Euonymus, Leafy Indoors, Vines, Asparagus Palims, Ferns, Dracaena, Ficus, Junipers, Flowering Shrubs Begonia, Geranium, Scented Leaf Geranium, Pelargonium and Gerbera.
There will be a selection of fine wines provided by Opici Wines and Dracaena Winery as well as a sampling of craft beers by Climax Brewing Company.
Mascarenhas said the common indoor species being brought to the camp include howea fosteriana or the Kentia Palm, dracaena massangeana, phaleonopsis, anthurium and dracaena marginata.
The only other possibility is that if you've put the Dracaena outside at any stage - perhaps during the warmer summer weather - and a bird could have dropped a seed into the compost.
Admittedly my lucky bamboo (a gift, naturally) didn't do anywhere near as well, but then I didn't know it was called Dracaena Sanderiana (nor that it was not even a real bamboo) until I reached Page 119 of Book Two, and by then it was too late.