Draconids


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Related to Draconids: Giacobinids

Draconids:

see meteor showermeteor shower,
increase in the number of meteors observed in a particular part of the sky. The trails of the meteors of a meteor shower all appear to be traceable back to a single point in the sky, known as the radiant point, or radiant.
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Draconids

(drak -ŏ-nidz) See Giacobinids.

Draconids

[drə′kän·ədz]
(astronomy)
Several meteor showers whose radiants lie in the constellation Draco.
References in periodicals archive ?
Draconid meteors are typically very slow moving, in marked contrast to members of showers such as the Perseids or Leonids.
The 1900 and 1907 dust trails were responsible for the 1933 and 1946 Draconid outbursts, each of which is a narrow expanse of dust now displaced from the current position of the comet.
Again through gaps in fast-moving cloud between 20:00 and 20:20 UT, Bob Mizon spotted four Draconids from Colehill, Dorset.
Taking advantage of rather better conditions, Richard Fleet, from near Pewsey in Wiltshire, saw 22 Draconids in a 43-minute watch beginning shortly after 20:00 UT; most were 2nd or 3rd magnitude and his best spell was three Draconids in a minute at 20:11.
More observations of the Draconid outburst, using photographic, visual, and radio techniques, from individuals and groups in the UK and overseas, are urgently required to build up a full picture of the shower's rapidly changing activity.
Many observers in the UK attempted to photograph the Draconid outburst and successful images have been sent in by Peter Lawrence (Selsey, West Sussex), Alex Vincent and Richard Fleet.
There must be many observers --including many non BAA members--who witnessed the outburst of the Draconid shower, and we would like to encourage all these people to submit their observations to the Section, either via email to meteor@britastro.
The 2011 Draconid shower was also noteworthy for the number of observers who attempted to record the shower's activity using radio detection techniques.
However, in addition to the main peak between 20:05 and 20:15 UT, which was well observed by the Turkey group, it is possible that lesser, short-lived secondary bursts in Draconid activity were also noted around 19:15 and 19:38 UT.
Visually, the Draconid ZHR was generally low (<50 m/h) until around 18:30 UT on Oct 8, when a noticeable increase in activity occurred.
Overall, the timing of the observed Draconid outburst was a triumph for the theoreticians who, using the dust trail model, had predicted which of the older dust trails laid down by the parent comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner the Earth would intersect near to the nodal crossing point.