tarragon

(redirected from Dragon's wort)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

tarragon

(târ`əgŏn), perennial aromatic Old World herb (Artemisia dracunculus) of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
..... Click the link for more information.
 family), of the same genus as wormwood and sagebrush. It has long been cultivated in Europe and W Asia for its leaves, used for flavoring vinegar, salads, sauces, soups, and pickles. Its essential oil, sometimes called estragon, is occasionally used in perfume or, in the Old World, medicinally to stimulate appetite or as a diuretic. Tarragon is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
Enlarge picture
tarragon

tarragon

Slender branched stems with very thin silvery leaves. Cluster of small yellow-green flowers. French Tarragon rarely has flowers. Soup flavoring. Used to thin blood, Insomnia, nausea, hiccups, hyperactivity, stimulates appetite, helps digestion, especially oily foods. Smells a little like anise, tastes like licorice. Also used to expel worms. Bugs and pests hate it’s smell, so it’s good to grow together with other plants in a garden.Do not use if pregnant (uterine stimulant)

Tarragon

 

the foliage of Artemisia dracunculus. It is used as an herb, especially in Transcaucasia.


Tarragon

 

(Artemisia dracunculus), a perennial plant of the family Compositae. The herbaceous stem is 60–125 cm tall. The leaves are lanceolate-linear, and the white flowers are in round heads.

Tarragon is native to Mongolia and Southern Siberia. It is also distributed in Asia Minor, Middle Asia, Mongolia, North China, and North America. The plant is cultivated in Iran, India, the USA, Brazil, Sri Lanka, Great Britain, the Federal Republic of Germany, Hungary, Bulgaria, and the USSR (in Transcaucasia). The aromatic leaves are used as salad greens and as condiments or seasonings. They are also used for pickling vegetables.

Tarragon requires fertile soils. The seedlings are planted in open ground and spaced about 25 cm apart. In the south tarragon overwinters well in open ground; in the north it is covered with humus. Tarragon can be cultivated on the same plot for ten to 15 years.

REFERENCE

Kapelev, I. G., and V. I. Mashanov. Prianoaromaticheskie rasteniia. Simferopol’, 1973.

tarragon

[′tar·ə‚gän]
(food engineering)
A herb prepared from the pungent leaves of the tarragon tree (Artemisia dracunculus).

tarragon

1. an aromatic perennial plant, Artemisia dracunculus, of the Old World, having whitish flowers and small toothed leaves, which are used as seasoning: family Asteraceae (composites)
2. the leaves of this plant