Drake equation


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Drake equation

[′drāk i‚kwā·zhən]
(astronomy)
An equation which gives the number of advanced technological civilizations curently active in the Galaxy as the product of the rate at which new stars are born in the Galaxy, the probability (actually a product of probabilities) that any one of these stars will possess the necessary conditions for life to originate and to slowly evolve to a technological civilization, and the average longevity of such civilizations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Drake Equation takes into account a number of factors, including how often stars suitable for life are formed, the fraction of those stars that actually have planets, the number of planets per such solar system that might have life-sustaining environments, the fraction of those on which life actually appears, a further fraction on which civilizations exist with the ability to develop technology that can be detected from space, and the length of time over which those civilizations release signs of their existence into space.
The second half presents the scientific perspective, beginning with how what we know about chemistry and biology on Earth constrains what aliens could possibly be like, and continuing on to the famous Drake equation and current possibilities for detecting extraterrestrial life.
There's an equation called the Drake Equation which estimates the probability of finding a planet capable of supporting intelligent life.
Using the Drake equation, first theorized in 1961, such planets were intuited and later proven to actually exist.
ONE by one, the empty boxes in the Drake Equation are being filled in with actual numbers, and it's looking good.
He also tests the validity of the Drake Equation, which states all the ingredients you need to make an intelligent civilization.
The Drake Equation works out the science of Star Wars: Apparently it estimates the number of active communicative extra terrestrial civilisations in the Milky War galaxy.
This is analogous to the Drake equation in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.
The well known Drake equation has been created to help estimate the number of technologically active civilisations in the Milky Way.
I was particularly struck by his section on the Drake Equation, which cannot yet be precisely solved.
Releasing his 'Why I Don't Have a Girlfriend' thesis after a three-year love drought, Peter Backus, a tutor at the University of Warwick, has used a famous maths formula called The Drake Equation.
Starting with the assumption that one visitation per year is the real thing he uses the Drake equation to determine how many technical civilizations there might be in our Galaxy.