Dred Scott Decision


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Dred Scott Decision

 

the decision in the legal case of the American Negro slave Dred Scott. The case was heard at different levels of the court system and started in 1848, when Scott asked the court to declare him a free man since for four years, from 1834 to 1838, he had lived with his master in the free states of Illinois and Wisconsin. In 1857 the US Supreme Court declared Scott a slave. The decision implied that a slave was his master’s property even in free states; it reflected the desire of the slaveholders to extend slavery to the whole country. The Dred Scott decision caused numerous protests in the USA and contributed to the strengthening of the abolitionist movement.

Dred Scott decision

controversial ruling stating that Negroes were not entitled to “equal justice.” [Am. Hist.: Payton, 203]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Dred Scott decision, in part, tried to clarify the legal status of individual Native Americans.
The Dred Scott decision reflected the conundrum that states' rights southerners confronted in the face of the abolitionist surge; while they insisted that slavery was a local institution, the sanctity of slave property in the territories might require the federal government, as common agent for the states, to intervene.
Lincoln proposed, in fact, ignoring or challenging the most general conclusions of the Dred Scott decision as much as possible, and members of his administration were encouraged to do the same.
Was he the Supreme Court justice who infamously wrote, in the 1857 Dred Scott decision denying citizenship to blacks, that they had "for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order.
4) But more political damage was done to Douglas by the third question, when Lincoln asked directly whether Douglas would support a second Dred Scott decision holding that no state could prevent slavery.
1) The Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision of 1857, which upheld the right of slave owners to maintain possession of their slaves even in states where slavery was illegal, also seemed to support the contention that the Constitution was pro-slavery.
His predecessors have tended to portray the Dred Scott decision as an abuse of judicial power, "a failure of partisan justices to steer their court away from contentious political and social issues that it was not equipped to solve.
44) Pierce in his final State of the Union Address (45) and Buchanan in his Inaugural Address, (46) endorsed, in advance, the forthcoming Dred Scott decision.
Lincoln intimates that there is another mode by which he can reverse the Dred Scott decision.
The Supreme Court delivered the Dred Scott Decision, which declared that slaves could not be U.
Ironically, Taney had manumitted most of his slaves and was opposed to slavery when he led the Court in the fateful Dred Scott decision of 1857.