Needle Gun

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Needle Gun

 

a breech-loading rifle. When the needle gun was fired, a needle pierced the bottom of a paper cartridge and ignited the explosive and fuze of the percussion shell. The first needle gun with a rifled bore was the Prussian rifle created by J.N. Dreyse in 1840, which increased the rate of fire five times and had the tactical advantage that the soldier could load the rifle while in a prone position. After the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, in which the needle gun proved its superiority, A.A. Chassepot in France developed a new needle gun of better design and greater accuracy than the Dreyse rifle. The Karle rifle in Russia was very similar to the Chassepot rifle. By the late 19th century needle guns were replaced everywhere by more advanced rifles with a spring firing pin placed in the breechblock.

References in periodicals archive ?
84) Most of the 20,000 Prussian troops were equipped with Dreyse needle guns, while the Austrians had muzzle loaders.
Dreyse, Reichsbank vice president, to Harrison, 10 July 1931, Harrison Papers.
In the aftermath of the Seven Weeks War, the army came to the conclusion that the cause of its humiliation was that the Prussians had been armed with the breechloading Dreyse "Needle Rifle.
Although victorious, the German armies carrying the outdated Dreyse needle gun were up against the French Chassepot with a range twice that of the Prussian rifle.
Von Dreyse came up with an early self-contained paper cartridge chambered in rifles and pistols, and Hunt's "Rocket Ball," which involved a hollowed-out lead bullet containing powder and primer, was used in the early Volcanic "volition" repeaters, but it appeared later than the pinfire.
A: The 7,62mm Model 1907 Dreyse auto pistol was not invented by Nikolaus von Dreyse (who died in 1867), but named after him as a sort of tribute.
While superior in almost every way to the Dreyse, the French did not have enough of them when the Franco-Prussian War erupted in 1870.
Both rifles shot about 12 inches high (a common phenomenon I have noted with other military rifles of this period), the Dreyse giving a best 50-yard, rested spread of 21/2 inches with three holes touching and the Chassepot 2% inches.
The Vetterli incorporated, in concept, the side loading port, tubular magazine and cartridge lifter of the Winchester Model 1866: the turning bolt of the Dreyse needle gun with the locking lugs of the Greene/Chassepot.