drift ice

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drift ice

[′drift ‚īs]
(oceanography)
Sea ice that has drifted from its place of formation.
References in periodicals archive ?
And the community's narwhal hunters, who harvest at the ice edge during the annual spring break-up, now carry small boats on their sleds to avoid being stranded on drifting ice.
But brutal winds, sub-zero temperatures, drifting ice, and hungry polar bears pose chilling threats.
Following their day in the fjords, Bancroft and Arnesen will travel to Borneo Base -- a temporary camp set up on drifting ice in the Arctic Ocean -- to train April 14-24.
Jon Russill guided the team through -30C temperatures, past polar bears and through drifting ice fields that moved them backwards every night.
It is what Ernest Shackleton did when his ship, the Endurance, sank beneath the ice in the Weddell Sea in 1915 and he had to walk with his crew over drifting ice.
Sue was an assistant producer on The Blue Planet and Doug proposed as they sat on a slab of drifting ice, waiting for a helicopter to rescue them.
Yet, according to Dave, while the drifting ice and expanse of Arctic skies may appear monotonous to the uninitiated, to him they provide spectacular and ever-changing beauty.
Surviving on a diet of oioaked muesli, pastas and chilli along with a little chocolate, the adventurers battled drifting ice and were sometimes forced to walk around ruggedterr ain and open water, all adding nearly 100 nautical miles to what was supposed to be a 480-mile trek.
A Fisheries and Oceans Canada/Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker spent a year frozen in place only moving with the drifting ice pack, in an historic scientific expedition in the high Arctic ocean basin.
Among the technology highlights is work to enable cost-effective 3D seismic for exploration prospect evaluation in ice, and the ongoing development of a tailor-made, Arctic drill unit that will be one capable of operating in a wide range of water depths across the Arctic, and will involve combined activities in drifting ice.
It is what the famous explorer Ernest Shackleton did when his ship, the Endurance, sank beneath the ice in the Weddell Sea in 1915 and he had to walk with his crew over drifting ice in the same region.
The second data set, running from 1954 to 1990, consists of temperature measurements made by Russian teams stationed on drifting ice islands for periods of several months to several years.