cup

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cup

1. a unit of capacity used in cooking equal to approximately half a pint, 8 fluid ounces, or about one quarter of a litre
2. a mixed drink with one ingredient as a base, usually served from a bowl
3. Golf the hole or metal container in the hole on a green
4. Christian religion the chalice or the consecrated wine used in the Eucharist

Cup

 

in sports:

(1) Sports competitions conducted, for the most part, in accordance with the Olympic system (whereby the loser is eliminated from further competition) and principally for sports where the participants are in direct opposition to each other.

International cups include world cups (for example, the Davis Cup, established in 1900, which is the unofficial world championship in tennis), intercontinental cups (the soccer cup that has been competed for since 1960 by the strongest clubs from Europe and the Americas), and continental cups (for example, the European championship cups in basketball, soccer, and hockey, most of which were established in the 1950’s and 1960’s). Cups are also held in individual countries (in the USSR in 1973 there were cups in 25 sports; the first was for soccer, dating back to 1936). One of the oldest is the Stanley Cup, awarded to the best professional hockey team of Canada and the USA (since 1892).

Sometimes the term “cup” is used for team or individual competitions conducted in accordance with different systems (round-robin, mixed, etc.)—for example, the World Cup for volleyball (since 1965) and the European cups for gymnastics (since 1955) and track and field (since 1965).

(2) A prize, as a rule, a challenge cup, which is awarded to the winner of competitions (either a team or an individual athlete).

What does it mean when you dream about a cup?

In psychoanalysis, a cup is a symbol of the female and female sexuality. Alternatively, an empty cup can represent receptiveness.

cup

[kəp]
(design engineering)
A cylindrical part with only one end open.
(engineering)
A low spot forming on a tool joint shoulder as a result of wobbling.
(mathematics)
The symbol ∪, which indicates the union of two sets.
(metallurgy)
Sheet metal part formed during the first deep-drawing operation.

Cup

[kəp]
(astronomy)

cup

1. The deviation of the face of a board from a plane.
2. A metal insert in a countersunk screw hole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turn into 3- or 5-ounce paper drinking cups, filling about 2/3 full.
PRODUCTS 61 General 61 Cups 64 Drinking Cups 67 Paper Cups 73 Plastic Cups 80 Foam Cups 88 Packaging Cups 93 Materials 95 Producers 97 Food Cups 98 Portion Cups 102 Other Cups 106 Lids 108 Types 111 Drinking Cup Lids 111 Flexible Lids 118 Other Lids 121 Materials 123 Plastic Lids 124 Other Lids 125 IV.
Other growth factors include expanded beverage menus in quick service and other restaurants; trends toward larger and more expensive drinking cup sizes; and heightened demand for more costly but more environmentally friendly products, such as cups made from biodegradable resins or incorporating significant amounts of recycled content.
Hoerauf systems make paper components for a complete range of products including trays and drinking cups.
Lid demand growth will outpace that of cups, fueled by an increasing percentage of drinking cups utilizing lids, heightened demand for costlier specialty lids, and healthy increases for single-serving packaging cups, all of which have lids or flexible lidding.
Some of the drinking cups have two fangs poised above them.
The drinking cups consist of NatureWorks' Ingeo([TM]) biopolymer, made from plants, not oil.
The process was used to make PS drinking cups by the late 1960s.
Growth in lid demand will outpace cup demand, the result of an increasing percentage of drinking cups using lids, growing demand for higher-value specialty lids and continued solid advances for single-serving packaging cups.
These lines produced thin sheet for thermoformed yogurt and drinking cups and thick sheet for marine parts.
The needs of the Navy are being addressed through a unique cooperative partnership with the goal of producing drinking cups, food wraps and eating utensils that will safely biodegrade when composted or placed in a marine environment.