Drohobych

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Drohobych

(drô'kôbĭch`), Pol. Drohobycz, Rus. Drogobych, city (1989 pop. 78,000), Lviv region, W Ukraine, in the N Carpathian foothills. The major petroleum-refining center of the Boryslav oil field, it is linked by an oil pipeline with Boryslav and a natural gas pipeline with Dashava. An old Ukrainian settlement, Drohobych belonged to Kievan RusKievan Rus
, medieval state of the Eastern Slavs. It was the earliest predecessor of modern Ukraine and Russia. Flourishing from the 10th to the 13th cent., it included nearly all of present-day Ukraine and Belarus and part of NW European Russia, extending as far N as Novgorod
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 until the 14th cent., when it passed to Poland. It was taken by Austria in 1772 but reverted to Poland in 1919; in 1939 it was included in Ukraine.
References in periodicals archive ?
MORDECAI ROSHWALD, emeritus professor of the humanities at the University of Minnesota, was born in 1921 in Drohobycz, Poland.
His murals depicting scenes from German fairytales, ordered in 1942 by Felix Landau, a member of an Einsatzkommando, for his son's bedroom, were secretly removed in 2001 by Yad Vashem representatives from the former Landau residence in Schulz's hometown, Drohobycz (in today's Ukraine), and transported to Israel, opening an international debate: Whom does Schulz belong to?
The average synopsis tells you he was a sickly, neurotic, Jewish-Polish school teacher from Drohobycz (a provincial town which now belongs to the Ukraine).
His collection of short stories, Drohobycz, Drohobycz, published by Penguin Books, received the 2002 Koret Jewish Book Award.
Drohobycz, Drohobycz and Other Stories: True Tales from the Holocaust and Life After.
Bruno Schulz lived, wrote, and died in the southeastern provincial town of Drohobycz.
His father died a natural death, but his grandparents were murdered by the Nazis, as were other relatives who did not flee Drohobycz in time (Drohobycz, incidentally was home to that other filial memorialist, Bruno Schulz).
But here Grossman creates another possible Bruno, one who flees from his Drohobycz ghetto and escapes to the port of Gdansk, pursued by the Gestapo.
Aside from reprints of his earlier books, Grynberg's titles include Dziedzictwo (1993), Drohobycz, Drohobycz (1997), Ojczyzna (Homeland, 1999).
An SS officer in the Drohobycz ghetto made Schulz his house-Jew, and used him to draw murals in his house.
The Hucul country of the Carpathian Mountains immortalized by Stanislaw Vincenz; Jerzy Stempowski's Dniester Valley; Jozef Wittlin's Polish-Ukrainian Lwow; the Polish-Austrian Galicia of Zygmunt Haupt and Andrzej Kusniewicz; Andrzej Chciuk's Drohobycz, now in Ukraine; the Berezya River region of present-day Belarus, described by Florian Czarnyszewicz; the Litwa of Czeslaw Milosz and Tadeusz Konwicki; and, finally, the Polish-German borderlands: the image of all these homelands which emerges in the literature is one of regions inhabited by multi-ethnic and multi-fa ith communities, full of varied customs and traditions.
Drohobycz, Drohobycz comprises eleven tales, eight written in the nineties and three reprinted from Szkice rodzinne (1990).