Drosophila

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Drosophila:

see fruit flyfruit fly,
common name for any of the flies of the families Tephritidae and Drosophilidae. All fruit flies are very small insects that lay their eggs in various plant tissues.
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Drosophila

 

a genus of insects of the family Drosophilidae. The genus consists of small insects (about 3.5 mm long) with a bulging body and, as a rule, red eyes. Drosophila is distributed all over the world, with 25 species in the USSR. It is found everywhere, especially in vegetable and fruit storehouses. The larvae develop mainly in fermenting, frequently semiliquid, plant residues. Because of the ease with which they can be raised in the laboratory, the rapidity of their development, and the distinctness of segregation of species in the offspring, several species, chiefly the common banana fly (D. melanogaster), became a major object of genetics research after the work of the American scientist T. Morgan. Mutagenesis was studied quantitatively in Drosophila, and the first experimental mutations were induced in it. In nature, Drosophila is important as a carrier of yeast fungi.

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Whilst dietary treatment with Bacopa monnieri leaf extract demonstrated beneficial effects in a transgenic Drosophilia model of PD and importantly assessed outcome as well as markers, additional research is required to further understand the dosing, safety and clinical effect of B.
On the advice of an untrustworthy friend, Drosophilia (Willa O'Neill), Lucinda decides to test Karl's devotion by exhibiting increasingly bizarre behavior.
Topics include cell adhesion molecules at the Drosophilia neuromuscular junction, synapse formation in the mammalian central nervous system, developmental axonal pruning and synaptic plasticity, cell adhesion molecules in synatopathies, the cadherin superfamily in synapse formation and function, nectins and nectin-like molecules in the nervous system, the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule, molecular basis of lamina-specific synaptic connections in the retina, cell adhesion molecules of the NCAM family and their roles at synapses, ephrins and eph receptor tyrosine kinases in synapse formation, the role of integrins at synapses, and extracellular matrix molecules in neuromuscular junctions and central nervous system synapses.