Asha

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Asha

 

al-Asha (poetic nickname meaning “weak-sighted”; real name, Abu Basir Maimun ibn-Qais al-Bakri). Born 530; died about 629. Arab poet.

Asha spent most of his life wandering about Arabia and supporting himself by reading his poetry. He was associated with Nestorian Christians in Hira. He did not accept Islam although he was a monotheist and wrote a laudatory qasida (ode) in honor of the prophet Muhammad. He was considered the innovator and best representative of “wine” poetry in ancient Arabia. His qasida is included in the collection of the seven best works of ancient Arabian poetry.

WORKS

Gedichte von Abu Basir Maimun ibn Qais al-Asha. Edited by R. Geyer. Leipzig, 1928.
Zwei Gedichte von al-Asha. Edited, interpreted, and annotated by R. Geyer. Vienna, 1905.

REFERENCE

Rescher, O. Abriss der arabischen Literaturgeschichte. Constantinople, 1925.

Asha

 

a city in Cheliabinsk Oblast, RSFSR, in the extreme western part of the oblast on the Sim River (tributary of the Belaia). It has a railroad station on the Ufa-Cheliabinsk line. Population, 37,000 (1967). There is a metallurgical plant (founded in 1898), a forestry-chemical combine (founded in 1932), and an electrical armature plant. There is also an industrial technicum. In the vicinity there is phosphorite mining and processing. Asha arose in 1898 and became a city in 1933.

Asha

in moral sphere, presides over righteousness. [Zoroastrianism: Jobes, 138]
See: Justice
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