Drum Major

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Drum Major

 

a noncommissioned officer in charge of a regimental drum and bugle corps and responsible for the corps’s training. The position of drum major was established in the French Army in 1651; the position existed in the Russian Army from 1815 to 1881. Drum majors were chosen from among tall noncommissioned officers. They wore an elaborate uniform and carried a baton with a gilded knob and tassels, with which they gave signals to the corps.

References in periodicals archive ?
The previous drum majors came in and told me that I was required to at least show up at the parties.
Mr Whillans, who spent almost 10 years as Jedburgh's drum major, said he wanted the band to "push the barriers" and slammed the "depressing" rehearsals.
The Director's Award went to senior drum major Jaime Lintemoot.
As for separate-section, outdoor awards judged only for the week of May 1-5, Palmdale percussion, drum majors and the auxiliary group each won first place, Rees said.
A PIPE band drum major has won a top award - four years after doctors gave him three months to live.
Dubbed the Martin Luther King Drum Majors for Service, the honorees were chosen, in part, because of the link between CDCUs and the civil rights movement, explained National Federation CEO Cliff Rosenthal.
Organisers admitted the ban was unpopular and one said: "it's very hard for the drum majors.
The school added drum majors sporadically over the years.
Emphasis: High school drum majors, conducting, marching, leadership and workshops.
King's famous prophetic sermon, there is still time for us -- if we act quickly -- as individuals and as a nation to become drum majors for justice, peace and righteousness.
Berlet and his fellow leftist "watchdogs" have been dutiful drum majors, leading a veritable parade of media stories depicting the American "right wing" as allies of Osama bin Laden.
The espontoon, which looks like a spear, is a weapon, and badge of office, that was carried by officers during the 18th century; today it is used by the head drum major of the Fife and Drum Corps to issue silent commands to the unit while they are performing.