Dry Law


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Dry Law

 

a law prohibiting the production and sale of alcoholic beverages. Such laws have been in effect in the USA (1920–33) and several other countries.

References in periodicals archive ?
The discontent with the dry law has been growing during the past few years, especially in regions of the country where the principal activity is foreign tourism," said the text of the Senate legislation.
Electoral authorities, however, said the end of the dry law does not mean a complete relaxation of guidelines on election day.
Reports from the mine record hundreds of workers dismissed or suspended every month for abandoning work, failing to fulfill the required production levels, laziness, fudging their production figures, insolence, violating the camps' dry law, missing entire workdays, immorality, and dishonesty.
Owners of some of these establishments, including Texas Guinan and Helen Morgan, became major celebrities, and their flouting of the dry laws enraged reformers while reinforcing a growing public perception of the Volstead Act as unenforceable.
It became one of the few places to obtain a drink on Sundays during the years of the Dry Laws in North Wales, and was therefore very popular
It also allows companies to skirt dry laws that govern many parts of the country.
In this, it is the beginning of the end of the dry laws that had dominated Dallas for more than century.
In Indiana, as elsewhere, the Klan's rapid growth coincided with the beginning of national Prohibition and of widespread violations of dry laws.