playa

(redirected from Dry lakebed)
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playa

[′plī·ə]
(geology)
A low, essentially flat part of a basin or other undrained area in an arid region.
A small, generally sandy land area at the mouth of a stream or along the shore of a bay.
A flat, alluvial coastland, as distinguished from a beach.
References in periodicals archive ?
I was startled to read the comment from Steve Mulligan (Endpiece, November/December 2000) about the strange rock "tracks" at the Racetrack, a dry lakebed in a remote part of Death Valley National Monument.
During a family camping trip, my daughter and I were riding in our new Rhino in Johnson Valley on the dry lakebed.
We entered the route by the Owens Dry Lakebed at 200 feet and 450 knots, strung out a mile in trail between each jet.
But the prospect of a single year of dam repairs, even if it requires a complete drawdown and results in a dry lakebed, is more bearable than a multi-year project.
Covering nearly 301,000 acres, Edwards is located in the Mojave Desert, adjacent to the largest dry lakebed in North America -- Rogers Dry Lakebed.
Fullerton piloted Columbia to a landing at White Sands, New Mexico - Edwards' dry lakebed was waterlogged from El Nino rains - in March 1982, the third shuttle flight.
The flight was delayed for about 3 1/2 hours because of a balky hatch on the B-52, then the necessity to move the landing site to another end of the dry lakebed because the delay was interfering with normal runway traffic.
Also as part of the agreement, LADWP will build a pump station with a capacity of 50 cubic feet per second to pump water from the Lower Owens River Project to the Owens dry lakebed for dust mitigation or back to the Los Angeles Aqueduct for water supply needs in Los Angeles.
Called a natural airdrome, the Rogers dry lakebed and surrounding airspace, known as the Air Force Flight Test Center has been and continues to be the optimum location for first flights and validation of high performance and experimental aerospace vehicles,'' the plaque inscription reads.
The LADWP agreed to build a pump station with a capacity of 50 cubic feet per second to pump water from the LORP back to the aqueduct or to the Owens dry lakebed for dust mitigation.
We disagree with a position taken by Los Angeles County Sanitation District 14 in several news stories about their wastewater effluent flowing onto Rosamond Dry Lakebed at Edwards AFB.
The LADWP also agreed to build a pump station with a capacity of 50 cubic feet per second, allowing LADWP to pump water from the LORP back to the aqueduct or to the Owens dry lakebed for dust mitigation.