playa

(redirected from Dry lakebed)
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playa

[′plī·ə]
(geology)
A low, essentially flat part of a basin or other undrained area in an arid region.
A small, generally sandy land area at the mouth of a stream or along the shore of a bay.
A flat, alluvial coastland, as distinguished from a beach.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were formed beginning in 1961 after Los Angeles County built a dike along Avenue C to prevent treated effluent from its District 14 Wastewater Treatment Plant from flowing onto the Rosamond Dry Lakebed.
In the center of a vast dry lakebed, a squad of soldiers from the nation's first Stryker brigade combat team has just launched a Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle for a five-hour training mission.
The directions to Hal's piece, which was on the dry lakebed, read something like, "Go down Broadway until it ends and continue in the direction of three o'clock.
The extraordinarily high air pollution levels recorded around the dry lakebed during dust storms have reached 25 times the levels of national clean air standards.
The discovery of fossilized evidence for life in a dry lakebed on Mars would be of great interest.
The landing zone is nothing more than a dry lakebed graded to provide demarcated aircraft landing, takeoff and parking areas.
I was startled to read the comment from Steve Mulligan (Endpiece, November/December 2000) about the strange rock "tracks" at the Racetrack, a dry lakebed in a remote part of Death Valley National Monument.
During a family camping trip, my daughter and I were riding in our new Rhino in Johnson Valley on the dry lakebed.
We entered the route by the Owens Dry Lakebed at 200 feet and 450 knots, strung out a mile in trail between each jet.
But the prospect of a single year of dam repairs, even if it requires a complete drawdown and results in a dry lakebed, is more bearable than a multi-year project.
Covering nearly 301,000 acres, Edwards is located in the Mojave Desert, adjacent to the largest dry lakebed in North America -- Rogers Dry Lakebed.
Fullerton piloted Columbia to a landing at White Sands, New Mexico - Edwards' dry lakebed was waterlogged from El Nino rains - in March 1982, the third shuttle flight.