dry stone wall

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dry stone wall

A wall composed of stones not cemented with mortar. dry strength The strength of an adhesive joint determined immediately after drying under specified conditions, or after a period of conditioning in the standard laboratory atmosphere.
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That was enough to spur me into action and I contacted "Master" dry stone waller Ken Young.
Originally built as field boundaries for the protection of animals or property, and bridleways, dry stone walls are very much a feature of this locality, just as they are throughout much of Yorkshire and in fact throughout the British Isles where building stone is provided by the local geology.
During the dry stone wall taster sessions attendees were taught everything from dismantling, laying foundation stones, through stones, building stone and filling, and then laying the copestones - the pieces of rock shaped for the purpose - on the very top.
Special mention must also go to local lad Adam, who continues to prove his outstanding ability in the field of dry stone walling by achieving yet another brilliant victory.
Gloria, by email: I grow encrusted saxifrages and sempervivums in a little dry stone wall I have here.
Dry stone patios, stone walkways and walls, benches, pergolas, gardening and special features—all built according to traditional standards, from natural materials, with an eye for artistic form and fine detail.
Ring is a dry stone wall builder, designer and artist.
The Field Boundary Awards 2012 recognise the efforts of people who create, preserve or maintain traditional dry stone walls and hedges in the Durham Biodiversity Partnership Area.
IS dry stone walling exclusively the preserve of older men with nut-brown skins and earthy pearls of wisdom?
Bengston has been building dry stone walls - stone walls that are held together without cement - for 25 years.
The oldest surviving dry stone walls (those built without the use of concrete or mortar) in Britain are to be found in Skara Brae in Orkney, Scotland.
Liz Crowsley, 49, was probably knocked out by the spooked cattle and suffered "postural asphyxiation" on a dry stone wall near Gayle in the Yorkshire Dales in June, coroner Geoff Fell said.