dry farming

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dry farming,

farming system adopted in areas having an annual rainfall of approximately 15 to 20 in. (38.1–50.8 cm)—with much of the rainfall in the spring and early summer—where irrigation is impractical. Seeding rates are used that correspond to the soil water supply; management practices that minimize water loss and soil erosion are also utilized. The land is often summer-fallowed (not used for crops) in alternate years to conserve moisture. Dry-land crops must be either drought-resistant or drought-evasive, i.e., maturing in late spring or fall; special varieties of crops such as wheat, barley, corn, sorghum, and rye are often used.

dry farming

[¦dri ′färm·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Production of crops in regions having sparse rainfall without the use of irrigation by employing cultivation techniques that conserve soil moisture.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the delineation of the dry-farming limit, Nutzel mentions the 300/350 mm isohyet, while most researchers in the Near East actually define the 250 mm isohyet as the theoretical dry-land farming limit.
Yet the obvious fit between grassroots projects in dry-land farming, forest beekeeping or soil conservation in the developing world and technological advances in the developed, make the skills and resources of the corporate sector uniquely relevant, says Harris.
He went on saying that his country wanted to encourage the exchange of young research workers and professors, in addition to the working out of joint programmes of research in fields of mutual interest, notably the development of dry-land farming.
I grew up on a high-plains, dry-land farming operation, and our entire region is or will be facing the realities of limited-irrigation.