Dry-pipe system

dry-pipe system

[′drī ‚pīp ‚sis·təm]
(engineering)
A sprinkler system that admits water only when the air it normally contains has been vented; used for systems subjected to freezing temperatures.

Dry-pipe system

A system for fire protection that uses pipes containing air under pressure instead of water; controlled by a valve that allows water to enter the pipes in the event of a fire.
References in periodicals archive ?
In locations more likely to freeze, you should have a dry-pipe system.
Even if they are built for colder settings, dry-pipe systems can also freeze if water enters the pipes improperly.
This balanced response was accomplished by using a dry-pipe system, a suppressant agent called FM-200, and intelligent smoke detectors.
The first part of creating a solution to this dilemma was a dry-pipe system, where the pipes leading to the sprinklers are initially empty and charged with air, and water in the system is held behind a junction point.
Similarly, dry-pipe systems, in which the piping is filled with air under pressure until the tire protection system activates, often collect moisture and condensation in low points in the system; again, providing environments in which stagnant water can promote corrosion.
Convert sprinkler systems to dry-pipe systems if building heat is not provided or convert to nonfreeze systems for small unheated areas.
A Fluid Delivery Time computer program that simulates water flowing through a dry system in order to accurately predict critical "water-to-fire" delivery time for dry-pipe systems.