dryads


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Related to dryads: hamadryad

dryads:

see nymphnymph
, in Greek mythology, female divinity associated with various natural objects. It is uncertain whether they were immortal or merely long-lived. There was an infinite variety of nymphs. Some represented various localities, e.g.
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dryads

divine maidens of the woods. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 108]
See: Nymph
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, its flexibility--it is "bent down to the ground" by the wind--its white skin, and its vulnerability--it is naked, "stripped of every leaf," and its tears fall like rain--give it a distinctly feminine quality very much in keeping with classical depictions of dryads.
Whitman's redwoods are happy to die, and the dryads and hamadryads are willing to leave the tree, as they are all somehow magically convinced of the natural supremacy of the human.
Here, though, by virtue of their titles, the Dryads invite us to see the pillar's volume (the figure) as a concentration or intensification of Nature--a body in which nature and woman are one.
Hermes was an independent spirit who spread his seed among goddesses nymphs and dryads.
The three effectively sung dryads were Andrea Coleman, Katherine Haugen and Karin Wolverton.
A puzzler ferociously feral, Whose muzzle puts wizards in peril, Roared jeremiads At druids and dryads While guzzling his beer by the barrel.
The Narnia is a magical world where, humans, fauns, dryads, elves, druids, satyrs, dwarves, witches and sorcerers, evil spirits, minotaurs, goblins, wreaths and of course talking animals, all live in strange harmony.
Those dryads, naiads, and satyrs rolling in threesomes on the ground invoke Morris's New Love Song Waltzes, and the whole third act owes L'Allegro.
These elves, dryads, trolls, dwarves, and the like have never seemed to hate anyone; they're just sort of amoral.
39] For d'Urfe as for Ficino in his summae of the Phaedrus, the Dryads and Naiads "[preside] over [the] generation and growth of subsequent written text," [40] though d'Urfe seeks to deny the value of writing.
The nymphs and dryads had "sacralized" the streams and woods, lending the divine a "local habitation and a name.