Drying House

Drying House

 

on single-family peasant farms, a wooden-framed structure in which sheaves of rye, wheat, oats, barley, and other grains were dried before threshing. Flax and hemp were also dried in such structures. Heat from a stove or from an open fire in a pit in the ground dried the materials. In the upper part of the drying house, the sheaves were placed on horizontal poles. In prerevolutionary Russia, drying houses were widely used in the northern and middle regions owing to primitive threshing methods. On kolkhozes and sovkhozes the need for such structures has been eliminated with the advent of grain-harvesting combines.

References in periodicals archive ?
THE Old Drying House is in a Grade II-listed Georgian terrace in the grounds of Gunton Park in Hanworth, close to Aylsham, Cromer and Norwich.
11 attacks were "religious-motivated violence, and I said to myself, this could happen in Uganda, too," Keki recalled while showing off the new drying house for the season's harvest.
The money used to build the drying house is deducted from the farmers' earnings and it can take a family as long as five years to erase the debt.
In the middle of 2011, the city opened six solar drying houses built next to the Paul R.
Official figures show that 3,500 tobacco drying houses, about 428 long tons of tobacco leaves (which although wet could be saved by drying), and 63 poultry farms were left in shambles, with most of the animals dead.